Archive for October, 2007

Rain, rain, rain

A little sidebar that went on while the wildfires were raging last week was the fact that New Orleans was getting more than their fair share of rain. Over eight inches of rain fell, flooding Mrs. Vee’s Auto Body Shop, which ironically had just re-opened after Hurricane Katrina back in 2005.

In addition, Mayor Nagin closed Cith Hall and several schools were closed while people were asked to stay indoors until the rain subsided. Catch the rest of the articles at USA Today.

 Sincerely-

Green Librarian 

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Forest fires and droughts

With the recent wildfires in California and the vast number of news stories about it, an interesting byline has been “what caused the fires?” There have been several articles written but the one that goes into the most detail is the the one entitled The Future is Drying Up in last Sunday’s New York Times Magazine.  

In conjunction to that article is the story about the drought down in the southeast. In particular, Lake Lanier and the Savannah River.  What’s interesting here is how it relates to the book I’m now reading, Watershed: The Undamming of America by Elizabeth Grossman.  The chapter I just finished was about the Glen Canyon Dam, the Colorado River and Lake Powell.  Two articles that give a good overview of the issues in the southeast are Southeast drought hits crisis point and Southeast withers from 16 months of drought woes, both in USA Today.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

Those in need of water

On a more somber note, I’ve found two articles that are perhaps telling tales to global warming or maybe just examples of the need to conserve our resources. I’ll let you decide

The first is a recent article in the New York Times about the shrinking of the Great Lakes. You can can also fine it here at this blog about buildings.

The second one is an article is just another in a long line of articles about the drought in the southeast. This one is entitled “Southeast drought hits crisis point” in USA Today.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

Water, water, water

As you have probably caught on to by now, the oceans are something near and dear to my heart. Here are three recent studies I have come across lately in regards to our large bodies of water: 

The first study, done by U.S. and Canadian researchers and recently released in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin, showed young Puget Sound orcas have almost twice as much of flame-retardant chemicals (called polybrominated diphenyl ethers or PBDEs) in their bodies than the elders in his pod. Check out the Seattle Times for the article.

The next study recommended “throwing out the FDA health guidelines for pregnant women”. The only problem was that the media forgot to do any fact checking. The study was paid for by the fish industry. Check out the Environmental Working Groups website for more info.

Last, a recent study by the WWF shows that the hooks used to catch tuna in the southern Pacific and Indian Oceans are killing endangered seabirds, sharks and turtles as well. Go to the Environmental News Networks website for more on that.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

My environment

My home environmnent has left me a little under the weather lately, not to mention my midterm test last week. That said, I have found a new good book that I would recommend. It’s call Watershed: The Undamming of America by Elizabeth Grossman.  

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

Walking to school and nature

I was surprised last week to see on the cover of our local newspaper (Webster-Kirkwood Times) a picture of some students here joining in the celebration of the seventh annual Walk to School Week.  In an age where kids are less active than ever, it’s nice to see some families still enjoy walking.

I hope to have some more on this topic later in the week (after my mid-term) , as well as, on a book that I read over the summer called Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv. This book has sparked a recent movement to get kids back outside. There is a local group here in St. Louis that I hope to also have more information on soon. 

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

Ocean Poetry

Ocean

Out of her salt hips poured my umbel.

My mouth full of shells and her tognue a lemon bristling my teeth.

Foam flowered and the black grapses tasted sweet again.

I smelled fenugreek, the cherry pit’s talcum, cod drying like a sandy slipper.

An amaryllis opened in my throat, and the pain issued toward the islands.

(author forgotten)

You can’t stop the ocean

We were trying to stop the ocean.

You can’t stop the ocean.

She wanted to understand love.

You can’t stop the ocean.

They walked day and night.

You can’t stop the ocean.

He couldn’t sleep.

You can’t stop the ocean.

Their words burned through.

You can’t stop the ocean.

My feet, my hands, my shoulders.

You can’t stop the ocean.

It’s so very very late.

You can’t stop the ocean.

We were trying to stop the ocean.

You can’t stop the ocean.

Wallace J. Nichols

Sincerely-

Green Librarian