Archive for January, 2009

While I’m on the topic of books

Speaking of books, I recently came across these two articles as I was finishing up Richard Louv’s Last Child in the Woods.

They were “Nature Benefits the Brain: Cities Impair Mental Functions” by Jennifer Lance at Ecoscraps and “How the City Hurts Your Brain” by Johan Lehrer at the Boston Globe.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Where the wild things are

As I read my latest book, The Wild Places by Robert MacFarlane, I was reminded of this article “Massive Prehistoric Fort Emerges From Welsh Woods” by James Owens at National Geographic. I also came upon this article today at the New York Times entitled “New Jungles Prompt a Debate on Rain Forests” by Elisabeth Rosenthal. Both they are both about returning to the  Wild.  

in the Wild-

 

Green Librarian

Here fishy, fishy

Here are a couple of other articles on our good friend the fish and their role in our place we call home.

First, “Fish Exposed to Antidepressants in the Wild” at EarthSky.

The other one is “Fish ‘an ally” Against Climate Change” by Catherine Brahic at New Scientist.

Swimmingly along-

Green Librarian

Ode to Shel Silverstein

Here’s a tip of the hat to an old friend (of my kids), Shel Silverstein and his wonderful song “Fish Guts” from the album Underwater Land. The article is entitled “Fish Guts Explain Marine Carbon Cycle Mystery” over at Science Daily.

Happy (en)trails!

Green Librarian

As I watch the river flow

As I look back at the Mississippi River and it’s large chunks of ice flowing along, I remembered I recently found this nice article on river restoration entitled “London’s Lost Rivers to be Restored” by Bonnie Alter at Treehugger.

Flowing along-

Green Librarian

Another angle

Here’s a group with another good idea on living with our neighbors. The article is “New Coalition Asks for Kinder Treatment of Wildlife” by Barbara Kessler at Green Right Now.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

The answer my friends

While there are plenty of animals in trouble such as the ones in the Our neighbors in need post and in this article “Tar Sand Mines are a ‘Death Trap’ for Migratory Birds” by Kari Lydersen at the Washington Post, there is also hope from articles such as “Nikki Davenport Spreads Her Love of Birds to University City Students” by Valerie Schremp Hahn at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

Our neighbors in need

On the flip side, we still have lots of neighbors in need. Here are just a few of the recent articles from both near and far.

These three come from over at Plenty Magazine on their Extinction Blog and are entitled “Manatee Deaths on the Rise“, “Poachers Threaten last 200 Giant Sable Antelopes” and “Report: Global Warming Poisoning Koalas“.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

A is for animal

There seems to be a fair amount of news these days regarding our neighbors so here is just a little.

First up, just in case haven’t seen the movie Fly Away Home (about a flock of geese that a man and his daughter teach how to migrate), here’s another heartwarming story entitled “One Man Saves an Entire Species” by Allison Boyer at Ecoscraps.

A second species, who actually wasn’t discovered until recently is the topic of “This Sneaky Pink Iguana Evaded Charles Darwin’s Attention” by Michael Graham Richard at Treehugger.

On a more tragic note, “Congo’s Gorilla “War Babies” (by CaT Lincoln at Green Daily) shows us there is always hope, even in the most darkest of times.

Finally, on a lighter note, comes these two articles. First is “Fifty-two Things to do with a Bat Wing: Scientists Record a Host of Nonflight Duties that Might Influence Wing Structure” by Susan Milius at Science News. The other is “FOR KIDS: Between a Rock and a Wet Place” by Stephen Ornes, also at Science News.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

Update on my rebuttal

Here’s one more article in that series entitled “Health Risks Stack up for Students Near Industrial Plants” by Blake Morrison and Brad Heath at USA Today.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian