Archive for April, 2014

12 birds of Christmas

12DaysofXmas2

Okay, so we’re a long way from Christmas but when my son realized that this photo I took at the St. Louis Zoo today is of twelve birds, we thought that this would make a great Christmas card.

That said, with all the birds we saw today, including these flamingos:

Flamingos

I was reminded of an article I read recently over at the New York Times entitled “Paying Farmers to Welcome Birds” by Jim Robbins. When we all work together, we can make the world a better place for the birds (and everyone else).

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

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Night lights

When I saw this video over at the Mother Nature Network, I immediately thought of the book I’m reading, The End of Night by Paul Bogard. The book is about artificial light but the video, “Fireflies Turn Dusk to Disco in Dazzling Time-Lapse Video” by Russell McLendon, is just about nature’s light and that is all good.

I hope it lights up your night. Unfortunately, we’ve got rain tonight.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Science tools for everyone

When I saw this article, “Science Tools Anyone Can Afford” by John Markoff at the New York Times, I thought it sort of takes citizen science to another level as it makes yet another tool more available to the masses.  How cool is that!?

Here’s a link to another article and video at the Mother Nature Network  on the FoldScope.  It explains the idea behind — and the power within -— of the FoldScope. The article is entitled “This 50 cent Microscope Folds Up Like Origami” by Jean Savedge.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

A fish tale

Funny how you sometimes find a good read when you least expect it. Such is the story with “An Evolutionary Family Drama” by Richard Conniff over in the opinion page of the New York Times. Truth be damned, it could be that I’m just a sucker for a good fish story.

Enjoy!

 

Green Librarian

Turtles & dinosaurs

As I’ve said many times, turtles have always been one of my favorite animals. So what do turtles and dinosaurs have in common? Well, according to this article, “Alligator Snapping Turtles, the Dinosaurs of the Turtle World, Are Actually 3 At-Risk Species” by John R. Platt, snapping turtles have been around for millions of years.

That would explain how they’ve actually been able to morph into three  individual species. Taking a look at them, they definitely looks like something from another time. Gotta love ’em.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

 

 

 

 

 

North by northwest to Alaska

I have to say that when I picked up the book Naturalist at Sea: From Dampier to Darwin by Glyn Williams, I wasn’t sure what I was getting into but up to this point, I think I made a good choice.

In fact, I’m only into the second chapter, Ten Years of Preparation; Ten Hours of Exploration: The Alaskan Tribulations of Georg Wilhelm Steller, but I’ve learned so much about the northwest.

In fact, when I recently read the article “How the 1964 Alaska Earthquake Shook Up Scienceby Becky Oskin at LiveScience,  my interest in the region was only piqued more. I turns out that this year is the fiftieth anniversary of that earthquake.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

 

Northern lights

Recently I was thinking about how whenever the kids and I are up north, it’s amazing all the stars that you can see. I’ve often said how it’s so crowded that you couldn’t stick another star up there.

Anyway, I was reminded of that when I read happened upon the book The end of night : searching for natural darkness in an age of artificial light by Paul Bogard. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian