Archive for May, 2015

Whales and Rhinos

While whales are no longer found in Africa (see my Whales in Africa post), Rhinos are still there but struggling. So it was nice to come across this article entitled “Endangered Rhinos in Kenya Are Taking Back Their Land” by Dodo over at Yahoo Travel. As a kid, I think they were one of my favorite animals. They just look so cool!

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

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Memorial Day

I didn’t have my kids this weekend so on Monday I sat and watched a movie entitled appropriately enough, Memorial Day. The main character, Bud (a WWII veteran) loved birds, especially the sounds they made. Anyway, it reminded me of an article I read recently entitled “When Birds Squawk, Other Species Seem to Listen” by Christopher Solomon at the New York Times.

The article talks about how birds and even other animals communicate between themselves. Now I can’t remember at the end what it was Bud said about maybe why he loved birds so much, but maybe it had to do with songs. Anyway, If I find out, I’ll let you know. Both the movie and article are well worth the time.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Whales in Africa

Whales have always been one of my favorite animals, particularly as an adult. I’ve been fortunate enough to have several opportunities to visit the oceans over the years but that was back when I was much younger and unaware of their deeper beauty.

When I saw this headline, “When whales roamed in what is now Africa” over at the Environmental News Network via Southern Methodist University, it took me back. Seventeen million years back.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Herbivores, Carnivores, Omnivores and Detritivores

So my youngest son and I were at the Missouri Botanical Garden yesterday for a school field trip where they talked about food chains. That’s where they talked about herbivores, carnivores, omnivores and detritivores. The last one I must admit I’d not heard before.

Unfortunately I came across an article today that talked about a recent study on herbivores and the news wasn’t good. The article is entitled “Which is most valuable: Gold, cocaine or rhino horn?” at UCLA Newsroom. If that’s not depressing enough, here’s a link to the actual study at Science magazine.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Elephants

It seems like over the last several days I received more than a few e-mail’s on ways to help reduce the demand for ivory products which would hopefully reduce the poaching of elephants for their tusks. The last one I received was from the Humane Society of the United States.

So in honor of Endangered Species Day this Friday, I hope everyone takes the time to do something to help these majestic animals. A couple of ways you can help are by visiting the action page of the Humane Society of the United States or the Wildlife Conservation website where you can take action or watch the 96 Elephants video and help education others.

For Horton (Hears a Who)!

  

Green Librarian

Rest in peace

This is actually a very sad and tragic article that I’m posting today. It’s about two scientist up in the Arctic region that were traveling to a remote outpost near a patchwork of islands between Canada and Greenland.

It appears that they may have fallen through some thin ice, the same ice they had been studying in relation to climate change. The article is entitled “These 2 heroic scientists died while studying the climate” by Tim McDonnell at Grist.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Canada & icicles

Only in Canada would they create an atlas on icicles. It was put together by Dr. Stephen Morris at the University of Toronto and a graduate student (now an instructor at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in Calgary) Dr. Anthony Chen.

You can read all about it in the article entitled “Winter’s Sculptures, a Drop at at Time” by James Gorman over at the New York Times. How cool is that (no pun intended)?

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian