Archive for March, 2016

Birds of a feather, flock together

I have to say that this article discusses something that I’ve seen going on in our neighborhood recently. In fact, when the kids and I were running some errands the other day, I had my daughter take a couple of pictures. I’ve included the best one:

Blackbirds.jpg

The article is about how flocking birds move in unison and is entitled “How do flocking birds move in unison?” by over at Earthsky. It’s also got some great video. Check it out.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

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Ice age puppies

As I’m sitting here writing this post, I’m suddenly reminded of the movie Ice Age. I have to admit though, when I think of that time period, I think more of wolves than I do dogs.

Anyway, according to the article entitled “Caveman’s best friends? Preserved Ice Age puppies awe scientists” by Maria Antonova over at Phys.org, these dogs or puppies are over twelve thousand years old.

With a little luck, maybe scientist will learn a little more about dogs and their relationship to wolves.

Woof! woof!

  

Green Librarian

Just put one foot in front of the other

Years ago I went to a talk on walkable communities and this article just took me back to that presentation. Like then, I would still agree that pedestrians are considered second class citizens in many cities.

The article I’m talking about is ‘Why are intersections designed for cars instead of pedestrians?  by Lloyd Alter over at Treehugger. I love the idea of having the drivers push the button to go instead of the people walking and if you agree, then check out the original article entitled  “About those pesky pedestrian crossing buttons…by Rachel Quednau over at Strong Towns.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Looking up

A while ago, my daughter how she sometimes finds herself looking up, just like me. I have to admit it is something that I like to do, whether it’s in the morning and I’m watching the birds that are out and about or the stars and planets late at night.

So when I came across this article while at work today, I thought what a nice story. Especially since I am one of those people who works in the city and gets a sometimes close up view of the birds downtown.

The article is entitled “When Birds Tangle With Cats and Windows, They End Up in Avian Rehab” by at Wired magazine. I must say, I have seen a few avian casualties of city life  but, also a few amazing views, such as the occasional raptor visitor to our building.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

18 types of frozen water?

When I came across this article, the first thought that went through my head is, there are seventeen types of frozen water? As a hockey fan, I’ve really only known one type of frozen water and that’s the kind they play hockey on.

The article is entited “A new form of frozen water? New study describes what could be the 18th known form of ice“, from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. So my new question is, is it solid enough to play hockey on?

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Ice stacking

Having been to Duluth, Minnesota this past summer and getting to hang out by lake Superior, I knew I had to post this video and then of course, I thought we need to go up there in the winter.

Okay, maybe not in the middle of winter but it would be fun, as evident by this article/video entitled “Watch hypnotic ‘ice stacking’ on Lake Superior” by Russell McLendon at Mother Nature Network.

The kids, my mom and I got to watch one of those huge freighters come in and that’s cool but, this was cool (or should I say cold) in a different way. It was all nature, no human’s were needed. That’s my kind of fun.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Learning a language

When I look back at middle school (where my daughter is now), I remember wanting to learn a language and at the time, I wanted to learn French. While I got the chance to use it many years later when I traveled to Paris, looking back now I’m thinking I wish I could have learned the language of rivers. After all, I work and live near the biggest one in the United States, the mighty Mississippi.

So what is the language of rivers you ask? Well, the best way to answer that question is with these two articles, “Learning the Language of Rivers, Part 1: A History of Confusion and “Learning the Language of Rivers, Part 2: The Basics” over at the Rosetta Stones blog on the Scientific American website. They’ll be a test afterwards.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian