Archive for April, 2016

Birds in flight

I had no idea that I would be writing this post tonight about birds. I simply sat down to watch television and as they say, the rest is history. First, I watched a PBS special on the Passenger Pigeon entitled “From Billions to None: The Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction, a film by David Mrazek and Joel Greenberg.

What surprised me was, that among the people they interviewed in the film, was a gentleman from the Lost Bird Project. A few months ago my daughter found an origami passenger pigeon in an old magazine which she was using for a school project and was nice enough to give it too her younger brother. After he was done with it, it I got in touch with the group who created that origami bird and it turned out to be the Lost Bird Project.

The next thing I know, I e-mailed them to see if we could get some more of the paper birds (which we were able too). I also ended up getting my son a really cool t-shirt of the passenger pigeon. After I finished watching that show, next up was of course, the Lost Bird Film. What a great night of television!

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Nature study movement

Since my kids were first born, one of my favorite things to do was to go out and learn about nature.Be it in Amphibian Night, Owl Prowl or Wetland Night. So when I saw this article tonight in an e-mail from the Richard Louv Children & Nature Network, I knew I had to post it.

Enjoy!

  

Green Librarian

Tree of life

Now I love trees as much as the next person but I have to say I’ve never seen a tree like this one. As the article mentions, it’s a whole lot different than the one that Charles Darwin back in 1837.

The article is entitled “New tree of life doesn’t look as you’d imagine” over at Earthsky. Call me old fashion but, I still like the old one.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

East & West

Back in the early nineties, I got the chance to go to Paris and I remember wanting to go to Germany because the Berlin Wall had just come down but, unfortunately I never made it there. So when I got an e-mail today from PBS today for the video Nova:Wild Ways, I was reminded of that time in the story entitled “ Life in the Death Zone” by Phil McKenna at Nova Next.

Unfortunately I’m going to miss it tomorrow so I’ll just go ahead and requested it from my local library. Tomorrow I’ll make sure to print up this article and read all of the article on the way home after work.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Parks in libraries and archives?

As both a librarian and an environmentalist, I found this article over at the blog for the Society of American Archivists’ Records Management Roundtable very intriguing. The article is entitled “How do you preserve a Park in a Library or Archives?” It sounds like fun to me.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Roadless roads

Today on the metrolink, for the first time in a long time, I got out a small journal I have and started to write. Maybe it’s a song, maybe it’s a poem, I don’t know but hopefully tomorrow I’ll get back to work on it. It’s entitled Roadless roads and was inspired by the paths up in the sky that the birds take, wherever their headed.

Meanwhile, today I received an e-mail from the Missouri by the Department of Conservation that described a new website entitled Great Missouri Birding Trails but unfortunately when I tried to access it tonight, it didn’t come up and so for that reason I decide do go a different route (See Flowing right along below). Funny how things change.

So now what I’ve decided to do (after already writing my usual post) is write another post about an article on the MDC website entitled “New Great Missouri Birding Trail website takes flight” by Lucas Bond. Hopefully that link will work. After all, it work this afternoon while I was at work.

Meanwhile, tomorrow the kids and I will be heading over to Amphibian Night to check out the Peeper frogs and other local amphibian by the Jay Henge Shooting Range, where they have a couple of ponds.

Cheers!

  

Green Librarian

Flowing right along

Since we’re on the topic of water, I thought I would post this article on the Four Klamath River Dams in Oregon and California. I swear this story has been going on since I was at my previous library, over eleven years ago.

The article is entitled “Saving the Salmon: Feds, States, Tribes Ink Plan to Demolish Four Klamath River Dams by Terri Hansen over at Indian Country. Here’s hoping we see the fall of the dams very soon.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Without water, there is fire

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Water residency and transit time

Just like humans, water resides in different places and spends time traveling to get from place to place. Also like humans, that time varies from drop to drop (or person to person). So then the questions are, how long does water reside in one place and how much time does it take to travel from one place to another?

Thankfully, we human are beginning to search for answers to these questions, according to the article entitled “How long does a water molecule stay in a river? The speed at which it leaves is critical to conservation efforts” by John Donovan over at Mother Nature Network.

Then maybe one day I can answer the burning question, how long it take a toy boat to travel from Lake Itaska down the Mighty Mississippi River down to the Gulf of Mexico? Believe me, the kids and I have tried but will little success.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Bears today

So while the discussions continue at to whether there were bears in the Permian age, you don’t need to go to far to see that bears today are in trouble as well. Be it polar bears in the Arctic, the grizzlies in the United States and brown bears in Europe.

Of course, when I came across this article, it only broke my heart even more. It seems that over in the Pyrenees Mountains, humans have been trying to replenish a brown bear population on the verge of extinction and unfortunately, trouble is brewing.

This according to the article entitled Pyros the Bear, Brought to Replenish the Pyrenees’ Ursine Population, May Have Been Too Successful: The Pyrenees now have little genetic diversity” by Matt Moffett over at the Wall Street Journal. What a tragedy.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian