Archive for July, 2016

Friends & relatives

When I read this article, I have to say it really opened my eyes in regard to what research chimps are put through. It also makes me wonder why human beings do what we do to chimpanzees, our closet living relative (or any animal for that matter).

The article is entitled “America’s last group of research chimps will make their home in North Georgia New sanctuary residents will find plenty of space (and smoothies.)“ by Mary Jo DiLonardo over at the Mother Nature Network. At least it lets us know that there are groups like Project Chimps (in addition to individuals like Jane Goodall and her Jane Goodall Institute) striving to end this barbaric process.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Turtle shells

As I’ve no doubt talked about before, turtles are one of my (many) favorite animals. In fact, I have a small collection of them on my bedroom window sill. They were also one of the first wild animals I was introduced to as a kid.

One of the things that make them unique obviously are their shells. Ever wonder why they have shells? Well, I thought they were for protection but according to this article, it was for burrowing.

The article is entitled “Scientists have finally discovered why turtles have shells: Turtles use their shells as shields today, but these devices evolved fo r a completely different reason” by Bryan Nelson over at the Mother Nature Network. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised, I thought birds had feathers for flying. Who knew?!

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Whale of a story

This article reminded me of the book The whale : in search of the giants of the sea by Philip Hoare , a book that really started my love of whales. The article is entitled “When Whales Started Living Large: A new study tracks ‘the rise of ocean giants’“by Brian Switek over on the Laelaps blog at Scientific American. I also highly recommend the book.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Up north

This article that has been sitting around here for quite a while now, in part because articles from the Wall Street Journal usually require one to log in,  is in fact now very timely on this late warm evening. It’s about a gentleman who proposes to sit on his dock for an entire day and watch the day go by.

As I read it, I realized it’s very similar to our family cabin up north, where the kids and I are presently planning to go in a couple of weeks. The most familiar of the players in this story are the loons, one of our neighbors on the lake. It doesn’t hurt that this article doesn’t require one to log in either.

The article is entitled “Every Chirp You Make, I’ll Be Watching You: In nature, something’s always happening” by Ned Crabb. I can’t wait to get going. Some things are just meant to be.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Birds in amber

It would make sense that amber is what tree resin eventually turns into with trees being one of my favorite things in nature and the place that many birds call home. Anyway, over the years I’ve also been interested in feathers. I always enjoy finding them when I’m outside.

Anyway, this article entitled “Mummified, 99-Million-Year-Old Wings Caught in Amber” by Laura Geggel over Live Science sort of brings all that together. You know, birds, feathers and amber. So enjoy the article and have a happy Friday!

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Mollusks & dinosaurs

Again, two animals I would have never put together. Similar I guess to what they do by studying tree rings to get an idea of what was happening on land, a group of researchers from the University of Florida and the University of Michigan have been doing a little dating, using the shells of the Mollusks in the ocean to also get an idea of what was happening on land.

The article is entitled “The demise of the dinosaurs found recorded in ancient mollusks: Researchers discover evidence of a one-two punch of climate change” by Michael d’Estries over at the Mother Nature Network. It always amazing me how they’re able to work backwards and look at what was happening millions of years ago.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Making North America

I had the chance to watch some of the PBS special Making North America last night with my kids and was pleasantly surprised that my youngest son was enjoying it. In part, the part where we learned about how this continent was actually divided into two parts millions of years ago. I also just checked the dvd out from the library last week and so I’m hoping to watch some of it this weekend.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian