Archive for January, 2017

Dose of nature

Okay, this is a great article on something I truly believe in, that getting outside is a good thing. I take a walk (ironically, it’s too my local library) every day on my lunch hour at work and I truly believe it help’s keep or put me in a great mood if I’m not already.

The article is entitled “The Power of a Dose of Nature” by Florence Williams over at the Wall Street Journal but unlike most article over there, you should be able to access it without an account but, just to be safe, it’s in the Review section of last weekend’s paper (January 28-29).

It’s these types of articles that keep me dragging my kids outside on our weekends and it’s just what the doctor ordered.

See you outside!

     

Green Librarian

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Rogue (citizen) science

Call it what you will but, watching science go rogue (or citizen) has been fun to say the least. It started out with the Badlands National Park and has now spread to several government science groups creating their own twitter accounts to make sure their information is out there for the public.

Check out this article entitled “Government science goes rogue on Twitter” by David Morgan over at CBS News. Who knows what’s next?

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

Migration mapping

After last year’s chance meeting of a Monarch butterfly coming out of it’s cocoon on the milkweed plant by our front porch, anything on the Monarchs grabs my attention. This article, entitled “Researchers identify monarch butterfly birthplaces to help conserve species ” over at Phys.org is a great example.

I know it’s still Winter but I’m already looking forward to Spring and our milkweed(s) blooming. Last year I actually planted one in the backyard too. Taking a family nature walk over at Russell E. Emmenegger Nature Park this past weekend on a day where the temperatures hit seventy also didn’t hurt. Yes, I know, I know, climate change is not good.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Art in nature

When I first decided to go to college, my degree of choice was art. I always loved art class when I was in school and so it made sense. Of course, that lasted about one semester as I realized what I liked and what was considered art by my instructors was not the same.

Looking back however, commercial art isn’t art. So here I am some many years later as a librarian and I’ve think I finally come to understand my love of art. I like writing, in particular writing about the environment and writing poetry.

I also like photography, a gift that my father gave me and why I’m hoping to finally get a camera this year. Until then however, I’ll keep using the one on my phone, trying to find that beauty in nature through a camera lense.

So this leads me to tonight’s article entitled “In Greenland, abandoned oil drums turn into fleeting art . The story here is about the artist Julia Edith Rigby and her desire to find art (or create art) in nature through garbage. Sometimes you just have to look a little harder.

Sincerely-

       

Green Librarian

 

 

All the time in the world

If you get the chance, and I’m hoping I will, check out this article and the movie (yes, I’ve already read the article). The article is entitled “‘All the Time in the World’ is a beautiful film about a family living in the Yukon wilderness” by Katherine Martinko over at Treehugger.

I will be the first to admit it’s something the kids and I might not be able to handle but at the same time, we have our own place where we have all the time in the world and that’s our cabin up north.

While my kids no doubt say “not right now” more than I care to hear, I fell like on vacation they have more of that “sure, let’s do it” attitude and that’s what I love most about vacation.

In fact, the last couple of years we’ve explored Duluth (even Milwaukee and Madison last year) and this year it’s going to be Mt. Rushmore. I know that we’re all looking forward to it. Only seven more months to go!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Blue day

Okay, so it wasn’t a blue day today but that sort of leads me to the topic of my article (maybe two) on blue whales. The first article is entitled “How Do You Dismantle a 90-Ton Whale? Start With a Strong Stomach and a Machete: When the corpses of two blue whales floated into two Newfoundland seashore villages, it presented a rare research opportunity; ‘I was totally slimed’” by Jacquie McNish but unfortunately it’s over at the Wall Street Journal. Since that usually requires a subscription, may I suggest that you run over to your local library and read it? It’s in the January 2, 2017 issue.

The second article however, is free and entitled “11 facts about blue whales, the largest animals ever known to live on Earth by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. I must say, while the first article gives you lots of in-depth information, this second article is sort of the short and sweet version of whales.

Now if all else fails, you can also go to your library and check out the kids book entitled Billy Twitters and His Blue Whale Problem by Mac Barnett (Author) and Adam Rex (Illustrator). Whew, that was a whale full!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Great Lakes & me

I have to say, ever since we started visiting the Great Lakes on our family vacations, my interest in them has grown and like most things green, I love reading and learning about them.

So anyway, that explains why I’m posting this article entitled “A Great Win for the Great Lakes: A Historic Victory for the Environment and Economy” over at the Nature Conservancy. Unfortunately I think next year we’re headed a little more west and North to Mt. Rushmore. Oh well, off to a new adventure and something else to love.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian