Archive for March, 2018

By the ocean

So as I talked about in my previous post, Summer vacations by the ocean, I thought tonight I would continue on about what one one topic one would typically talk about when discussing the ocean and beaches, sand.

The article tonight is entitled “The Sahara Desert is Growing. Here’s What That Means” by Mindy Weisberger over at Live Science. Reading this article reminded me, as any article on sand often does, of the book Sand The Never-ending Story by Michael Welland. Tonight I just requested it from the library again.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

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Summer vacations by the ocean

So as first day spring has passed and soon enough, summer begins to approach, I’m reminded of the times my family went swimming in the ocean or went to the beach. Probably twenty years or more but those memories are still some of my favorites when it comes to our summer vacations.

So maybe that’s why I’m always drawn to organizations that work to protect our oceans. Just this week in fact, I donated $20.00 to a group called 4Ocean, a group that focuses on cleaning up our beaches and oceans worldwide.

In return I get a bracelet made out of that recycled material they clean up. For each bracelet purchased, they will pull a pound of trash from the ocean. While Christmas is still a ways away, I will make sure before then to find another organization that works to help protect our oceans to donate too.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Polar darkness

So this was an article that I came upon a couple of months ago is one that I found just really fascinating. The quotes included come from a wide range of people all around the Arctic Circle region.

One individual who they quoted had the same last name as my mom’s family, which I was very surprised to see. Her name is Gunda Hackbarth. Hackbarth is in fact a very German name.

Anyway, the article is entitled “Snapshots From a Land of Endless Nights” by Josephine Sedgwick at the New York Times. The pictures are also incredible. It’s really just a great read.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Trees & climate change

There is no doubt that trees, like all other species of plants (and animals) for that matter, are going to be affected by climate change. With this article we already see that happening with our tropical tree friend, the palm tree.

The article is entitled “Palm Trees Are Spreading Northward. How Far Will They Go?” by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University courtesy of Science Daily. So for those of you that go to the tropics on vacation, perhaps you won’t need to go as far south in the future.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Rocks & stones

I get the feeling that I’ve written another post with the same title but it was probably a few years ago. That said, I’ve always been attracted to rocks and stones. If you look around my house, you’ll find plenty of them.

Some from the from various river beds in the area but, most however, from up north in Minnesota around our cabin and that area. In fact, many years ago, my daughter did one of her science fair projects on the rocks up north.

That said, this article from over at Live Science entitled “1.6 Billion Year Old Breath of Life Frozen in Stone” by Stephanie Pappas reminds of some of those rocks and stones as I’ve just recently started to sort them and place them throughout the house.

In fact, I was just re-reading an article that gave me the idea of rewarding my kids by putting rocks in their own jars and rewarding them after they got so many rocks. It’s called “Don’t Lose Your Marbles” by Malissa O’Brian over at Family Fun Magazine. Those are some really good memories.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Tree talk

Continuing along the theme of trees tonight, I came across this article the other day which reminded me of a book read a while back but can’t for the life of me remember the title and also talked about how trees talk to each other.

The article tonight is entitled “Trees Talk to Each Other in a Language We can Learn, Ecologist Claim” by Sara Burrows over at the blog Return to Now. Meanwhile, I will sit here trying to remember the name of that book.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

One is the loneliest number

At least according to the band Three Dog Night but in this case it’s a lonely Sitka Spruce tree on Campbell Island, 400 hundred miles south of New Zealand. For scientist, it’s a prime example of what humans have done to the environment.

The article is entitled “Does the World’s ‘Loneliest’ Tree Mark the Start of a New Epoch” by Noel Kirkpatrick over at the Mother Nature Network. So far, it looks like only time will tell and that is very unfortunate.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian