Archive for May, 2018

Oceans, carbon dioxide & climate change

So while scientist agree that the oceans play a role in climate change, at least in regards to the absorption of carbon dioxide, a recent article from some British scientist appears to show that the oceans might be absorbing many more times than originally thought. This according to the article entitled “Ocean Waves Show Earth’s CO2 Imbalance is Greater than Expected” by Jon Fingas over at Engadget.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

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Volcanoes 101

So as I said in an earlier post entitled Volcanoes, I learned a lot from my son and his interest in volcanoes and science projects over the years, but apparently there was still a lot for both my son and I to learn. These two articles tonight cover topics in which we didn’t discuss much, if at all.

The first is entitled “When it Comes to Volcanoes, What is Laze?” by Noel Kirkpatrick over at Mother Nature Network which talks about these steam plumes which are created when the lava flowing out of Kilhauea, hits the ocean. Now while we did talk about the reaction of lava when it hit the ocean, I must admit I didn’t know there was an actual term for that.

The second article is entitled “Why Eerie Blue Flames Just Erupted from Hawaiian Volcano” by Laura Geggel over at Live Science and talks about the blue flames that are currently popping up. These I don’t remember ever talking about. Oh well, back to school we go.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

 

Walk this way

So tonight I’m going to continue walking this way and talk about an article that reminds me of back in the day, when I use to walk to school everyday. The article is entitled “When Did People Forget They Could Walk?” by Ilana Strauss over at Treehugger.

Why I don’t walk a lot at home, I do walk everyday on my lunch hour at work. Mostly I go to visit my friends down at my local downtown library but I also go to the city garden and get exercise while taking pictures to send to my very good friend on the other side of the world.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Pedestrians

So as someone who will sometimes harken back to my childhood day’s of playing in the woods or just outside in general, this video made me do just that. I’m also thinking that since I walk to my local library at work every day, I think I would be someone who if I saw a hopscotch game on the sidewalk, I would probably jump right in.

The article and video, entitled “Surprise Hopscotch Experiment Provides Joy for Pedestrians (video)” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. Maybe if we all got outside a bit more.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Magnetic field

So I must admit that anytime I find an article on something that I know little about, such as in this case the earth’s magnetic field, it’s something I gonna read and find all I can on that topic.

The article tonight is entitled “Earth’s Magnetic Field is Drifting Westward, and Nobody Knows Why” by Stephanie Pappas over at Live Science. Now it’s time to start looking for some books over at the library. Okay, gotta go!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Sea turtles, box turtles

So as I’ve said many times before, turtles are one of my favorite, if not my favorite animal and one that shaped many of my early childhood memories. They were my earliest pet’s, though they always seemed to escape.

So whenever I find an article on turtles, be it sea turtles or box turtles, it’s a pretty safe bet I’ll post the article. Tonight’s article is entitled “Paleo Profile: Martin’s Sea Turtle” by Brian Switek over at Scientific American blog Laelaps. Who know’s, with summer here in the midwest already, maybe I’ll come across an article on box turtles one of these days.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

Volcanoes

One of my oldest son’s favorite topics all through school when he was growing up was volcanoes. Even today, we still have some of the evidence of that, mostly from science fair projects that he did over the years. Consequently since it was one of his favorite things, I came along for the ride and I must say, I learned a lot.

One thing I learned is that there are lots of them and many continue to erupt or disrupt our planet even to this day. One needs to look no further than Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano. Meanwhile on the other side of the world in New Zealand, the crater of a dormant volcano has apparently collapsed.

You can learn more about it over at Live Science in the article entitled “Enormous New Zealand Sinkhole to be Fenced in so Cows Aren’t Swallowed Up” by Yasemin Saplakoglu. So even today, I sometimes wonder what might happen at various volcanoes all around world.

Sincereley-

   

Green Librarian