Archive for July, 2018

Heading north

Since I missed last Thursday and Tuesday of this week, plus in a week we’ll be making our annual trip up north to our family cabin in Minnesota, I thought I would post two articles tonight and this article in particular. I’ve been to both Bemidji and Duluth, both places used as directional advisors in this article, so either way we’ve got it covered.

The article is entitled “1 Hen, 76 Ducklings: What’s the Deal with this Picture?” by Sarah Mervosh over at the New York Times. Makes me want to jump in the car tonight. Oh well, only one more week.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

 

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Landmarks

So when I read this book review (actually two of them) for the book Landmarks by Robert Macfarlane, I was immediately taken back to my childhood. To the times we played in the woods and all the landmarks that were there. I’m reminded of the train tunnel, the open stony field and the grassy open field as well, which is now full of houses.

Anyway, the first review is over at the Wall Street Journal, which yes isn’t available unless you have a subscription. It’s entitled “Why You Can’t  Say Where You Are” by Tom Shippey. It’s also in the August 6-7, 2016 weekend edition of the Wall Street Journal.

I also happen to come across a review of the book over at the New York Time which is entitled “Review: ‘Landmarks’ a Book on Language and Landscape” by Sarah Lyall. Either way, it’s a great read and if you’re like me, will take you back to another time.

Enjoy!

     

Green Librarian

Plastics up north

So while all the headlines these day’s talk about plastics and our oceans, this story tonight is on another chapter of that story. It’s also about a place near and dear to my heart, the great lakes. The article is entitled “The Great Lakes Contain as much Plastic as the Oceans” by Katherine Martinko over at Treehugger.

On the bright side, I’ve greatly reduced my use of what are known as single-use plastic, like straws and plastic bags. In fact, tonight my son got a mint oreo shake and used one of our reusable metal straws. Yea!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Beaches & more

So my friend on the other side of the world went to the beach today (or yesterday if you’re over there). Anyway, tonight’s article (and a book that I can’t remember if  I’ve read so I went ahead and requested it from the library tonight) about sand, are real eye openers on a topic that most of us I’m sure don’t really think about.

On my ride to work each morning via our local train however, we pass a newly built station that reminds me of this topic. Now you might be thinking what does a station stop have to do with sand. Well, the main ingredient for cement or concrete is of course sand.

Anyway, check out this article entitled “Is the World Running out of Sand? The Truth behind Stolen Beaches and Dredges Islands” by Neil Tweedie over at The Guardian. If that doesn’t do it for you, check out the book Sand the Never-ending Story by Michael Welland. Now since I can’t remember if I’ve read this book already, let me just apologize now if I’ve recommended this book before.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

 

Forest bathing

So reading tonight’s article is just another one of those moments where things just sort of come together. It all started with the book I just finished today entitled The Hidden Life of Trees and where the author Peter Wohlleben, talked about all the benefits of trees, one of which is the compound phytoncides. It’s something that is emitted by trees and breathed in by humans.

Anyway, to learn more, just check out Peter Wohlleben’s book or at least read the article entitled “Vast New Study Confirms Significant Health Benefits of Nature” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. It might let you see trees in a whole new light.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Elephants

Okay, so it turns out I have a lot of favorite animals and just like in last night’s post, Cat person, I have another picture to share. In fact, this animal is another one of the set I was given years ago by my grandparents.

This article, like tonight’s post states, is about elephants and is entitled “Killing Field to Haven” by Rachel Nuwer over at the New York Times. It’s nice to come across success stories for any species, especially one’s that are my favorite.

Elephant

Again, another great memory. Thank you Nana and Grandpa.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Cat person

So over the years and even though we’ve had multiple cats in our house, I’ve often said to my kids that I’m not a cat person. I guess I now realize that while that’s true for domestic cats, I guess I’ve always had a place in my heart for wild cats.

Reading this article, entitled “Mountain Lions Went Extinct in Missouri in the 1920s. They May be Making a Comeback” by Edward McKinley over at the Kansas City Star, I guess brought that point home. I think of all the wild cats, my favorite cat has always been the leopard.

Maybe this picture below tells the story why. I got it from my grandparents years and years ago. Not the best shot, but certainly a great memory.

 

Leopard

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian