Archive for October, 2018

Bee stories

So I just finished reading the book Our Native Bees by Paige Embry and I have to say, what an excellent book with so many great stories. While I’ve always known about honey bees, like the ones we use to try and catch them as kids out by our honeysuckle bushes, I never knew that they’re not native to North America.

I certainly never knew that there are in fact over 4000 species of native bees and that they range in size from about an inch to less than the size of a grain of rice. In fact, on a recent field trip to a conservation area with my youngest son’s science class, I finally realized that I’ve actually seen some of those tiny ones before.

I also want to mention that towards the end of the book, the author talks about how we can all help support our native bees by getting involved in citizen sciences projects like the Great Sunflower Project (for more citizen science projects, you can also check out the scistarter website).

Go Citizen Science!

 

Green Librarian

Rocks & stones

As someone who has always picked up rocks and stones wherever I go, they have always fascinated me. From the ones I’ve gotten on vacation up north in Minnesota (some of which were later used by my daughter for a Science Fair Project) to the one’s I’ve gotten whenever the kids and I went out in nature, many now sit in jars throughout our house.

Anyway, this article entitled “This ancient gemstone found in the Galapagos is baffling scientists” by Ilana Strauss over at Treehugger is just another example of how they continue to intrigue scientist as well. For me, they no doubt always will.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Forest of the seas

When I read this article, I must admit I’d never read much about kelp or really seen the term kelp forest.  So I thought between my love of trees and forests, and the fact that the author of this article was looking for a way to spread this story, this would be a great article to write about today.

The article (or narrative as Kendra Pierre-Louis describe her work) is entitled “How One Climate Reporter Helps Readers Care About Kelp” over at the New York Times. While my post is not nearly as eloquent, hopefully it is a stepping stone to that aforementioned narrative.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Tornado alley is moving

As someone who thought we already live in tornado alley, it’s not exactly what you hear that actually tornado alley is moving closer to you. This according to the article entitled “Tornado Activity Rising Farther East, Including Missouri and Illinois, but Scientist aren’t Sure Why” by Seth Borenstein at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Watching the movie Twister the other day, certainly didn’t help either.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Here comes the sun

For bees,  it appears that the sun plays a very important role in their lives. According to this article,  entitled “Bees Go Silent During  Total Solar Eclipse” by Russell McLendon over at the Mother Nature Network, it actually sounds like they can’t live without it. Interestingly enough, it turns out the study took place in three states, including my own state of Missouri. So hopefully, the sun will keep showing up.

Sincerely yours-

 

Green Librarian

Our Native Bees

So that’s the title of the book by Paige Embry I’m reading right now and because of what I’ve learned about bees, I thought I would post this article tonight entitled “Mushroom Extract May Help Save Bees” by Noel Kirkpatrick over at the Mother Nature Network.

To say the book has been an eye-opener about native bees would be an understatement and speaking of eye-openers, here’s one of my recent pictures of a bee, though I will admit I don’t know the species (yet).

Bee

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Fossils

I’ve probably been fascinated with fossils since I was little. One of the first time’s I was introduced to them was somewhere between 4th and 6th grade. I can’t remember the exact time but I do remember they were little round circles that we chipped out of rocks.

Anyway, this article tonight takes me back not just to that place and time but also to the book Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet Worms: The Story of the Animals and Plants That Time has Left Behind by Richard Fortey.

So I almost forgot, the article is entitled “A Mysterious Fossil Points to the Origins of Lizards and Snakes” by Asher Elbein over at the New York Times. Believe it or not, I still have a couple of fossils lying around the house.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian