Archive for November, 2018

Mother earth’s main ingredients

For the last month or so I’ve been reading this book called Still Waters by Curt Stager and I must admit I’ve learned a lot about all the animals that live in our lakes which I never knew even existed.

Now tonight’s article, entitled “Living things unlike anything else on Earth found in random dirt sample by Bryan Nelson over at Mother Nature Network, is all about the animals that live in our dirt. To think, all I knew is that fish live in our lakes and worms in our dirt.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

It hasn’t rain in days…

Okay, in some place’s it hasn’t rained in centuries, this according to the article entitled “It hadn’t rained here in centuries – now it’s raining and everything’s dying” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. Who knew that rain could lead to mass extinction’s due to climate change?

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Great lakes

LS2016

As someone who has visited at least two of them and getting ready to start reading the book The Death and Life of the Great Lakes (courtesy of an article from Minnesota Public Radio) by Dan Egan, this article really caught my attention.

Not only does it discuss what’s happening to all of the great lakes really, it talks about how one person is trying to make a difference. The article is entitled “Ohio’s watershed moment: How to fix Lake Erie algae” by over at the Grist.

Quite fascinating read to say the least. Looking forward to going there again (we’ve only visited Lake Michigan and Lake Superior so far. The picture above is Lake Superior while on our family vacation in 2016.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

 

Solitary bees

So a couple of weeks ago, I wrote a post entitled Bee Stories where I talked about the book Our Native Bees by Paige Embry. In the book I learned so much about all the other species, outside of honey bees and bumble bees, the only two I probably knew anything about.

Anyway, seeing this article entitled “MaliArts designs city-chic beehives to save solitary bees” by Lucy Wang over at Inhabitat, made me realize how cool beehives can be. Honestly, I’ve always wanted to have one. I guess we’ll have to wait and see.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Hibernation

I must admit, this article makes me hope we get some snow this winter. As a kid, I got the chance to experience snow in all its glory, from sledding down our neighborhood street to making a snowman or even a snow fort in our front yard.

When my kids were younger, I always tried to get them outside if it snowed. While we haven’t had a lot of snow over the years and don’t have a great big hill to sled down, we did have our driveway. I even have a few pictures to prove it. I’ve often thought I would love to spend a few days in the winter at our family cabin in Minnesota,

Anyway, the article is entitled “Don’t hibernate this winter” by Katherine Martinko over at Treehugger. I can only imagine what it’s like up north, especially in Winnipeg, where we got the chance to go for a day while on our family vacation a couple of summers ago.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Rewilding

I love the term, rewild. In a world that seems like it’s in a constant state of development, it’s a breath of fresh air to see a group trying to return the land back to what it was before we got here. The article is entitled “The New Outdoor Getaway: Landscapes That Have been ‘Rewilded’” by Nina Sovich over at the Wall Street Journal.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Ozark rivers

I have to admit that I’ve only been down to the Ozarks a couple of times, to the best of my recollection. I’ve also never had the chance to canoe any of the rivers down there. I have however stumbled up mussel shells along the Meramec river, a little further north in St. Louis, with my kids over the years.

So even though we’ve worked to improve these rivers here in Missouri, according to the article entitled “Andy Ostmeyer: Unsettling Questions Linger Along Ozark Rivers” over at the Joplin Globe, we still have some work to do. Hoping to make Aldo Leopold proud.

Sincerely-

 

Green Libarian