Archive for February, 2019

Bee country up north

So even though I recently read the book Our Native Bees by Paige Embry, I must admit, I don’t remember reading about the Arctic Bumblebee. So imagine my surprise to come across this article entitled “6 Scientists, 1,000 Miles, 1 Prize: The Arctic Bumblebee” by James Gorman over at the New York Times. Who knew?!

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Fire and trees

So while reading this article was a bit depressing for someone who loves trees, it’s also an honest look at a situation that needs to change. For too long, we’ve always tried to put out every fire, when I think like this article and good science shows, is that sometimes fire is a good thing.

The article is entitled “Fire is our friend, trees are the enemy, and the world is upside down” by Nathanael Johnson at the Grist. Sometimes the hardest decisions work out for the best.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

What can I do?

So tonight’s article is inspired in part by a science project my son is doing for school where he’s counting the number of plastic, paper and reusable bags that people use at our local grocery store over a thirty minute period for the next couple of weeks.

The other part of the inspiration is the article entitled “Plastic pollution seems like such an overwhelming problem. What can I do? by   over at the Grist. Now while the count was a little disappointing:

Plastic 249, Paper 34 and Reusable 33

The article however, at least for me, is just another example of what can be done if we all do our part.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Ecosystems

So While I’m aware of ecosystems, and probably more of those on land, I must say I’ve never heard of a neuston. It is, as this article states, a zone that is just above and below the water’s surface.

The article is entitled “The neuston is a floating ocean ecosystem, and our plastic cleanup push could threaten it” by Starre Vartan  over at the Mother Nature Network. After reading the article, I realized I was sort of familiar with this ecosystem before, I just didn’t know it had a name.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Winter of days gone by

So, looking back at this winter so far, I’m a bit reminded of winters from my childhood. The difference being that this year’s winter happened most years, minus perhaps the arctic vortex that we got last week.

So while we lived in Minnesota only for a couple of years when I wasn’t even in school yet and when we do visit these days, it’s in the summer time, this article reminded me of the Minnesota (and even Missouri) winters of my childhood.

The article is entitled “Minnesota winters ain’t what they used to be over at the Grist. Oh, for the winters of days gone by, when I was in school. Now if I just get work to take a snow day. Hmmm?

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

January

Now over my years of collecting rocks, I’ve seen the term birth stones many times but have never really known much about them. At least until I came across this article entitled “The Astonishing Origin of Garnets in Rhyolite” by Dana Hunter at Scientific American.

So for the next twelve months, I’m going to start learning about birth stones. I will say this article alone has been incredibly educational. Unfortunately my birth month is November, so I’ve got quite awhile until then.

Sincerely –

 

Green Librarian