Archive for the ‘Dinosaurs’ Category

Loggerheads

So as I’m sure I’ve talked about before, when I was a kid growing up, I always loved box turtles.  In fact, just this summer, we ran into a couple of painted turtles on our vacation (for the first time in years) and it brought back some great memories.

Fast forward to today and while I still love them, I’ve also grown to love their relative, the sea turtles. That’s in part due to reading the book Voyage of the Turtle by Carl Safina, so seeing this article the other day made me very happy.

The article is entitled “Loggerhead sea turtles nesting in record numbers in Southeast” by Mary Jo DiLonardo over at the Mother News Network. To me, it’s just cool that they’ve be around since the dinosaurs and what kid doesn’t love dinosaurs!?

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Feathers & dinosaurs

So a few years ago I read the book Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle by Thor Hanson. Shortly after that I remember I started becoming more aware of feathers whenever I took a walk.

So imagine my surprise when I came across this article tonight entitled “Scientists just cracked the mystery of dinosaur feathers” by Ilana Strauss over at Treehugger. As soon as I saw this article, I was reminded of that book. Even today, I still enjoy finding a feather.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

History of space here on earth

1,000 or 66,000,000 years ago, it’s amazing how we are able to reconstruct what has happened in space with clues here on earth.  According to one article, “Space Explosion to Blame for Tree Ring Mystery, Astronomers Say“by Clara Moskowitz at Space.com, we see evidence in tree rings about an  gamma-ray burst that happened somewhere between 3,000 and 12,000 light-years away from earth.

“While just recently we’ve found more clues to support one of the possible ideas as to how dinosaurs became extinct over 66,000,000years ago in the article “Asteroid Impact That Killed the Dinosaurs: New Evidence” by Charles Choi at LiveScience.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

History of the Sea

Who would have thought that hundreds of millions of years ago the sea swept over Missouri. This is according to Diane Toroian Keaggy’s article over at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch entitled “Artist Brings New Arches to St. Louis with Museum Installation. The piece is called “Stone Sea” by British sculptor Andy Goldsworthy.

And what post about geology (and the material used to build the sculptor) would be complete without an article about the K-T Boundry. I discussed the topic with my son’s Science teacher a couple of weeks ago at his student conference.

For those of you who don’t know (and I have to say that I wasn’t too familiar with it either) the boundary marks the end of the Mesozoic era and the beginning of the Cenozoic era, and is associated with the Cretaceiys-Paleogene extinction or mass extinction. You can get more information on the K-T Boundry over at wikipedia.

Sleep tight!

 

Green Librarian

Fly, fly, fly away

Seeing this article reminded me of a wonderful book I read recently entitled “Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle” by Thor Hanson. The article is “Feathers Worth a 2nd Look Found on Tiny Dinosaur” by John Noble Wilford at the New York Times.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian