Archive for the ‘Earth’ Category

The earth plays hardball

So it seems to some scientist that at one point, the Earth began life with a hard shell (kind of like a turtle shell) that later developed into the plate tectonics we know today. This is however, just the latest study done in a long-standing debate about plate tectonics and earth.

You can read about the study in the article entitled “Earth probably began with a solid shell: New research suggests that plate tectonics began later in Earth’s history” at Science Daily, courtesy of the University of Maryland . Something tells me that this debate will continue for a while.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

Close to home

So tonight I’m staying close to home as I post a nice article I found here in my local paper, the Webster-Kirkwood Times. It’s entitled “Earthly Beasts Beware!” by Don Corrigan. I must say I agree.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Mollusks & dinosaurs

Again, two animals I would have never put together. Similar I guess to what they do by studying tree rings to get an idea of what was happening on land, a group of researchers from the University of Florida and the University of Michigan have been doing a little dating, using the shells of the Mollusks in the ocean to also get an idea of what was happening on land.

The article is entitled “The demise of the dinosaurs found recorded in ancient mollusks: Researchers discover evidence of a one-two punch of climate change” by Michael d’Estries over at the Mother Nature Network. It always amazing me how they’re able to work backwards and look at what was happening millions of years ago.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Life on earth, with a little help from space

Ever since I read “Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet Worms: The Story of the Animals and Plants That Time Has Left Behind” by Richard Fortey, the question of how life on earth started has always fascinated me.

This article over at Live Science seems to suggest it’s due in part to meteorites and comets and is entitled “Comet craters: literal melting pots for life on Earth” from Trinity College Dublin. Makes sense to me.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

View from the top

It’s a view of the earth that most people never see. Check out the article and short video about the view entitled “Earth, the Marvelous Blue Orbover at the New York Times by Dennis Overbye.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Water = hydroxide ions (better known as oxygen and hydrogen molecules bound together)

When I saw this article over at LiveScience, I immediately thought back to the book Here on Earth: A Natural History of the Planet by Tim Flannery.

The article is “Rare Diamond Reveals Earth’s Interior is All Wet” by Becky Oskin.I have to say that I didn’t know that scientist even believed there is water deep within the earth.

Cool!

 

Green Librarian

DNA or RNA?

I have to admit that reading about DNA and RNA this morning on the way to work, took me back to those biology classes I took in high school. So imagine my amazement when I came upon this article over at NewScientist entitled “Earth’s First Life May Have Sprung Up in Ice” by Linda Geddes.

It talks about how it maybe RNA and not DNA that brought about the first life here on earth. At the same time I was just starting to read chapter 17, What is Life?, in The Mathematics of Life with Ian Stewart also talking about the role of RNA and it’s relationship to DNA.

Wow!

 

Green Librarian