Archive for the ‘Earthquakes’ Category

Pieces of a puzzle

Ever since my oldest son got interested in volcanoes, I got an education about tectonics plates and how they work. So this article sort of took the discussion of tectonic plates from how they work to when did they first come about?

The article is entitled “The Earth’s Shell Has Cracked, and We’re Drifting on the Pieces” by Natalie Angier at the New York Times. Definitely taking the talk to the next level on tectonic plates.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Down south of here

So every every so often, they talk about the New Madrid fault and how much damage it could do. Honestly, with all the strange weather these days, I guess it wouldn’t surprise me though I sure hope it doesn’t happen.

This article, entitled “How likely is an Earthquake in the Midwest, South? The Big One Could be Coming” by Thomas Novelty at the Louisville Courier Journal via USA Today talks about the chances.

Sincerely-

 

Green  Librarian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turtle ghosts

So while it may not be the turtle ghosts, something is definitely going on where scientist don’t exactly know the answer. When a quake is felt around the world, it’s certainly not your ordinary quake.

The article tonight is entitled “The mysterious quake that just shook the Earth is definitely not an angry sea monster” by Ilana Strauss over at Treehugger. Perhaps not an angry sea monster, but turtle ghosts? I guess time will tell.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Two maps in one (post)

I don’t often post about two articles but tonight I’ve decided too, in large part because they both include maps. The first article, entitled “First ever digital geologic map of Alaska by the United States Geological Survey and over at Science Daily, has an awesome map and as I think I’ve said before, I do love maps.

The other article, while not about a map, does have a pretty cool map that goes along with it. It’s entitled “Intriguing Seismic Activity along the Cascadia Subduction Zone” by Dana Hunter and also over at Science Daily. Like her, I’m sort of a geology junkie too.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

 

 

Sink or swim

I remember seeing this story last year over at Live Science but knowing that my daughter is terrified of sink holes, I decided to not write about it. Well, it turns out that scientist may have an idea as to what is the root cause of this enormous hole.

The original story, “Dramatic Video: Louisiana Sinkhole Swallows Trees” by Becky Oskin  and the followup, “Gas-Charged Earthquakes Linked to Mysterious Louisiana Sinkhole” by Charles Quoi, are both over at LiveScience.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

North by northwest to Alaska

I have to say that when I picked up the book Naturalist at Sea: From Dampier to Darwin by Glyn Williams, I wasn’t sure what I was getting into but up to this point, I think I made a good choice.

In fact, I’m only into the second chapter, Ten Years of Preparation; Ten Hours of Exploration: The Alaskan Tribulations of Georg Wilhelm Steller, but I’ve learned so much about the northwest.

In fact, when I recently read the article “How the 1964 Alaska Earthquake Shook Up Scienceby Becky Oskin at LiveScience,  my interest in the region was only piqued more. I turns out that this year is the fiftieth anniversary of that earthquake.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

 

Japan

As Japan continues to make headlines with the article entitled “6.5-magnitude quake hits off Japan, local tsunami warningover Yahoo today, many throughout the world worry.

This is evident in the article published last week entitlte “Blindsided by Ferocity Unleased by a Fault” by Kenneth Chang at the New York Times.

We also see their anxiety in this piece over in the  Weekend Art section of the New York Times entitled  “Anxiety on the Fault Line: Taking the Cute Out of Japan” by Holland Cotter.  

Sincerely-

Green Librarian

Topic of discussion

As the kids and I were out getting dinner tonight, we happen to be discussing the probability for an earthquake here in St. Louis and while it is probably low, I came across this article on more an area in which the probability is much higher.

Check out “More Than 50 New Earthquake Faults Discovered in California” by Rhonda Winter via the LA Times. While it’s true that the probability is probabily low here in St. Louis, we do have the good old New Madrid fault down south (not to scare my daughter but, my oldest son brought it up anyway).

And to follow up on my post this week on volcanoes,  check out these volcanoes in “Ancient Asphalt Domes Discovered Off California Coast” at Science Daily.

I think I’ll stay in St. Louis-

Green Librarian

Earthquakes, tsunamis and homework oh my!

Every time I turn around, there’s another assignment due in one of my classes. While I wrote this draft back at the beginning of the month and evey though mother nature is not currently at it again, I thought I would complete my train of thoughts here.

The first article here is one that kind of started this whole process. It’s entitled “A Deadly Quake in a Seismic Hot Zone” by Henry Fountain at the New York Times. It also has some very cool maps.

Speaking of maps, here’s another article (actually about a map from the NOAA). It’s entitled “Crazy Tsunami Maps from NOAA-And You Thought the Recent Chili EarthQuake was Bad…” by Matthew McDermott at Treehugger.  

And speaking of Tsunami’s, although this hasn’t happened, it’s a scary thought. Check out “When Will a Mediterranean Tsunami Hit Italy?” by Richard Fisher at the New Scientist.

Now back to the earthquake in Chile. Here’s another article from the New York Times by Alexei Barrionuevo. This one’s entitiled “The Sea, Lifeblood of Chilean Towns, Turns Deadly“.

And finally, here’s one last map on regions around the world in which  the subject  is earthquakes. It’s entitled “Disaster Awaits Cities in Earthquake Zones” by Johan Spanner and yes again it’s from the New York Times.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian