Archive for the ‘Ecosystems’ Category

Yellowstone National Park or ecosystem

This is a video that I just came across recently but it’s actually from several years ago and it’s a perfect example of how I believe that in nature when you upset one piece of the pie, the rest of the pie is upset as well.

The story/video is entitled “How Wolves Change Rivers – video by GrrlScientistover at The Guardian. It’s really a quite amazing video and I must admit I learned a lot about how just the wolves in Yellowstone affect the whole park.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Ecosystems

So While I’m aware of ecosystems, and probably more of those on land, I must say I’ve never heard of a neuston. It is, as this article states, a zone that is just above and below the water’s surface.

The article is entitled “The neuston is a floating ocean ecosystem, and our plastic cleanup push could threaten it” by Starre Vartan  over at the Mother Nature Network. After reading the article, I realized I was sort of familiar with this ecosystem before, I just didn’t know it had a name.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Wolves & our ecosystems

Reading this article tonight is just another example of how removing even one species from an ecosystem shows us that everyone plays a role here on earth. The article here is about one of my favorite animals, the wolf and one of my favorite parts of nature, our trees.

The article is entitled “After Killing all the Wolves in Yellowstone, They Finally Brought Them Back-Here’s What Happened Next” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Border collies and wildfires

Who knew that border collies could help out with restoring the burnout forests of Chile by simply running around and playing. It seems that the Torres sister’s and their border collies did just that in this article entitled “Border Collies Run Like the Wind to Bring New Life to Chilean Forest” by Mary Jo Dilonardo over at the Mother News Network.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Nature at it’s finest

So this article, at least to me, show’s nature at it’s fines despite what some human’s continue to do to this planet. The article is entitled “The Amargosa River Defies the Desert” by Jim Robbins over at the New York Times. This river in the middle of a desert and all the animals that live within it’s ecosystem, simply amazing.

Sincerely-

       

Green Librarian

Sand prairies

So last night I was reading the latest issue of the magazine xPlor, a magazine I use to get for my kids and put out by the Missouri Department of Conservation, and came across an article entitled “Into the wild Sand Prairie“. I’ve known for a while that Missouri has several ecosystems tucked into it but I was unaware one of them is called a sand prairie.

So afterwards, I searched for more articles on the sand prairie and came across this article in 2004, entitled “A Prairie in the Swamp” by A.J. Hendershott in the Missouri Department of Conservation’s magazine the Missouri Conservationist. Now I just need to get down their with my kids.

Sincerely-

       

Green Librarian

 

 

The tiniest of life

So life as we know it has parts that come in all shapes and sizes. Well, according to this article, entitled “The Most Obscure Species Could Be Key to Saving the Planet” by Richard Conniff over at Takepart, it seems you never know who might be a key player in an ecosystem.

If you’ve ever played the game called Jenga, then your already ahead of the curve in translating that to how ecosystems work in nature. Check it out.

It might lead to realize how each action you take in your life might just play a role in nature and let you see how making changes, even small ones, can really make a difference.

Sincerely-
  

Steve

A thin bridge of sand and rock

As much as I’m afraid of spiders, I still find them fascinating. I also thought that this article about them gives us a good example of just how fragile  ecosystems can be.  Just a thin bridge of sand and rock is what connects these two countries.

Check out the article “Critically Endangered Tarantula Links India and Sri Lanka” by John R. Platt over at the Extinction Countdown blog from Scientific American.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Meanwhile, a little closer to home

Just the other day, as I was waiting to take the Metrolink to work, I noticed a small bug walking in between sections of the platform and I wished that I had a camera to get a picture. So when I read this article tonight, “A Short Safari In a Small Oak Tree” by Alex Wild over at the Scientific American Compound Eye Blog, I thought hey I need to get my camera out this weekend for all of the small worlds.

Just like in Horton Hears a Who, there are lots of small worlds within ours.

Cheers!

 

Green Librarian

Wolves & rivers, rivers & wolves

It seems like every time I turn around I get an e-mail asking for my help to contact someone or give money to help wolves. I remember as a youngster listening to wolves up north in Minnesota around our cabin.

This video over at Yahoo! entitled “How Wolves Can Alter the Course of Rivers” I think it really shows how wolves affect ecosystems and the world around them. Which reminds me, I need to take my kids to our Endangered Wolf Center this year and let my kids see these amazing creatures.

Maybe one of these years, when we head up north, they’ll get the opportunity to truly experience what I did.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian