Archive for the ‘Elephants’ Category

Elephants and bees, oh my!

So I thought for sure I already posted this article before but after doing some green librarian research, apparently I haven’t. That said, who knew that one of the largest animals (the elephant) on the planet would be scared of one of the smallest (the bee).

The article is entitled “Elephants Are Very Scared of Bees. That Could Save Their LivesBy

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Advertisements

Elephants

Okay, so it turns out I have a lot of favorite animals and just like in last night’s post, Cat person, I have another picture to share. In fact, this animal is another one of the set I was given years ago by my grandparents.

This article, like tonight’s post states, is about elephants and is entitled “Killing Field to Haven” by Rachel Nuwer over at the New York Times. It’s nice to come across success stories for any species, especially one’s that are my favorite.

Elephant

Again, another great memory. Thank you Nana and Grandpa.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Africa and conservation

I must say that after my grandparents gave me a set of five wooden animals including a leopard, antelope, elephant, giraffe and rhinoceros which were actually carved in Kenya, my love for these animals began.

Africa

So seeing this article on conservation in Namibia was refreshing in a small way. The article is entitled “Namibia: Africa’s Conservation Success Story” by Laura Moss over at the Mother Nature Network. Here’s hoping the animals in Namibia outlive my wooden animals and perhaps none the worse for ware than my collection.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Elephant road trip

Okay, this migration has a little more uncertain path. It’s the migration of Elephants out of Africa. While the exact route is still unclear, this article at least helps us begin to map out their road.

The article is entitled “The Mammoth March: Paleontologist Are on the Fossil Trail of How Elephants Walked out of Africa  by Brian Switek at Scientific American. At this point, there are still a lot of unknown variables.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Good news for elephants, tigers and orangutans

With all the depressing news these days about elephants, tigers, orangutans and the like, it’s nice to see some good news. It seems that WWF, the Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) and The Orangutan Project (TOP) are taking a unique approach to conservation.

They will be actively managing a former logging forest known as Bukit Tigapuluh (or Thirty Hills) on the island of Sumatra, thereby protecting rather than exploiting the 40,000 hectares of forest land’s natural resources.

You can find out more in the article entitled “Long-term Protection Achieved for the Sumatran Forest” from WWF Global via the Environmental News Network.  A big thank you to the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry. Hopefully this will be the beginning of a beautiful relationship with other groups following their lead.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

 

Sixth extinction

Each day I read about elephants, rhino’s, lions and other majestic beasts that human’s continue to try to elimnate yet as we enter what has been called by many as the “sixth extinction”, we find that the vast majority of species that are moving this way have actually been invertebrates.

This according to the article “Invertebrates Are Forgotten Victims of “Sixth Extinction”” by Christopher Intagliata over at Scientific American. So let’s keeping plugging along, one species at a time and as Christopher Intagliata says, if you care about this you just can’t give up.

Just as an FYI, it’s also the name of a book on my reading list, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Herbivores, Carnivores, Omnivores and Detritivores

So my youngest son and I were at the Missouri Botanical Garden yesterday for a school field trip where they talked about food chains. That’s where they talked about herbivores, carnivores, omnivores and detritivores. The last one I must admit I’d not heard before.

Unfortunately I came across an article today that talked about a recent study on herbivores and the news wasn’t good. The article is entitled “Which is most valuable: Gold, cocaine or rhino horn?” at UCLA Newsroom. If that’s not depressing enough, here’s a link to the actual study at Science magazine.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian