Archive for the ‘Fires’ Category

Fire clouds

So I recently wrote a post entitled Fire & science about the fires in California and mentioned a book I previously read entitled Fire Season by Philip Connors. Well, to follow that up, I recently came across this article entitled “Amid California Forest Fires, 3 Books Set Among Flames” by Concepcion De Leon in the New York Times that also suggested that book, along with two others. I think I need to add them to my must read list.

Now normally I only post one article but I also came across this article the other day on those California wildfires entitled “California’s wildfires are Spawning ‘Fire’ Clouds by Michael D’Estries over at the Mother Nature Network.

I may or may not have mentioned it before, but clouds are also one of my favorite topics. Which reminds me I need to look up that book I read on clouds several years ago, that first got me interested in them. I also just checked and found out that it’s not on my Green Reading List, so I need to add it. A librarian’s job is never done.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

 

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Fire & science

So once again, I have another article that unless you have a subscription to the Wall Street Journal, you’re going to have to go to your local library to read. It should be in the December 11, 2017 edition.

With wildfires spreading across parts of California on a daily basis, it’s hard not to be saddened by this story. That said, this article is actually about the science involved here. It’s entitled “Hunting the Ventura County Wildfire, Trying to Predict its Next Attack by Erica Phillips over at the Wall Street Journal.

It also reminds me of the book Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philips Connor. The book offers great insight into how we currently handle wildfires. Definitely, food for thought in regards to the wildfires in California and elsewhere.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

 

Wildfires

I must admit over the years of writing I’ve always been fascinated with wildfires. What they do in the sense of death and re-birth to the land. I think the first book I read on wildfires was Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Conners.

Tonight I have two more articles on the topic. They are entitled “How a Wildfire Kicked Up a 45,000-foot Column of Flames ” by Kyle Dickman over at Popular Science and “Great Plains Wildfires Used to be Rare. Not Anymore” by John Upton at The Grist. The reality is that they are becoming more the norm.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

New Fire Season

So whenever I see an article on forest fires, I’m reminded of the book I read a few years ago entitled “Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout” by Philip Conners. I must admit that while it sounds scary, it’s something that has always intrigued me.

Unfortunately, times have changed and this article goes to talk about that. It’s entitled “New era of Western wildfire demands new ways of protecting people, ecosystems” from the University of Colorado at Boulder over at ScienceDaily.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Forest fires

So it’s back up in the nineties here in St. Louis again and what topic do I pick to post about but, fire which in turn always reminds me of the book “Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout” by Philip Conners.

Reading this article tonight however, entitled “Let it burn: Smokey was wrong. You can’t prevent wildfires, and you shouldn’t try” b over at the Grist was an eye-opener to say the least. The most surprising part was the fact that climate change plays a rather minor role when it comes to forest fires. Learn something new everyday.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Big burn

I must admit I’ve always been fascinated by fire. The book that got me started was probably Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Conners. As the aforementioned article over at the New York Times indicates, it’s really a book about the story of fire.

Anyway, today I watched the movie Big Burn over at PBS today and one of the forest rangers that  they talked about was a gentleman names Ed Pulaski. So in honor of Ed (and Jenny Bennett, who wrote this piece but has since passed away), the post is entitled “Ed Pulaski and the tool he invented“.

Holy Smokes!

  

Green Librarian

Fire & smoke

So for most of us, going to work means getting dressed, making a lunch and perhaps taking a backpack or brief case. In the case of a Smokejumpers, it’s a little more complicated.

Now I’ll be the first to say, sometimes we need to let mother nature take her course but I also think that sometimes they are needed. Unfortunately this article isn’t available online unless you have a subscription but it’s a great read. The article is entitled “What to Take Along to Get a Jump on Forest Fires” by Hilary Potkewitz over at the Wall Street Journal.

Or you could go to a public library like I did. Anyway, it’s a great read. For a little more information on what they do, visit the U.S. Forest Service website.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian