Archive for the ‘Forest’ Category

Tree talk

Continuing along the theme of trees tonight, I came across this article the other day which reminded me of a book read a while back but can’t for the life of me remember the title and also talked about how trees talk to each other.

The article tonight is entitled “Trees Talk to Each Other in a Language We can Learn, Ecologist Claim” by Sara Burrows over at the blog Return to Now. Meanwhile, I will sit here trying to remember the name of that book.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Advertisements

Fire clouds

So I recently wrote a post entitled Fire & science about the fires in California and mentioned a book I previously read entitled Fire Season by Philip Connors. Well, to follow that up, I recently came across this article entitled “Amid California Forest Fires, 3 Books Set Among Flames” by Concepcion De Leon in the New York Times that also suggested that book, along with two others. I think I need to add them to my must read list.

Now normally I only post one article but I also came across this article the other day on those California wildfires entitled “California’s wildfires are Spawning ‘Fire’ Clouds by Michael D’Estries over at the Mother Nature Network.

I may or may not have mentioned it before, but clouds are also one of my favorite topics. Which reminds me I need to look up that book I read on clouds several years ago, that first got me interested in them. I also just checked and found out that it’s not on my Green Reading List, so I need to add it. A librarian’s job is never done.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

 

Fire & science

So once again, I have another article that unless you have a subscription to the Wall Street Journal, you’re going to have to go to your local library to read. It should be in the December 11, 2017 edition.

With wildfires spreading across parts of California on a daily basis, it’s hard not to be saddened by this story. That said, this article is actually about the science involved here. It’s entitled “Hunting the Ventura County Wildfire, Trying to Predict its Next Attack by Erica Phillips over at the Wall Street Journal.

It also reminds me of the book Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philips Connor. The book offers great insight into how we currently handle wildfires. Definitely, food for thought in regards to the wildfires in California and elsewhere.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

 

Ancient forest

I saw this story over on NBC and I thought it was so cool. What is cool though isn’t just the fact that it’s there but that these fisherman actually pursued this to begin with. The story is entitled “The Unveiling of an Ancient Underwater Forest off Alabama Coast” by Kerry Sanders. As someone who loves trees, I also love all forests.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

In wildness is the preservation of the world

So I’ll admit it, I didn’t know that July 12, 2017 is the 200th birthday of Henry David Thoreau but like so much of my life these days, I seem to stumble upon what I need, when I need it.

This article, entitled “Thoreau’s Wilderness Legacy, Beyond the Shores of Walden Pond ” by Douglas Brinkley over at the New York Times is what I ran into today. Happy (belated) Birthday Henry! I think it’s time to take a walk.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Wildfires

I must admit over the years of writing I’ve always been fascinated with wildfires. What they do in the sense of death and re-birth to the land. I think the first book I read on wildfires was Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Conners.

Tonight I have two more articles on the topic. They are entitled “How a Wildfire Kicked Up a 45,000-foot Column of Flames ” by Kyle Dickman over at Popular Science and “Great Plains Wildfires Used to be Rare. Not Anymore” by John Upton at The Grist. The reality is that they are becoming more the norm.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

New Fire Season

So whenever I see an article on forest fires, I’m reminded of the book I read a few years ago entitled “Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout” by Philip Conners. I must admit that while it sounds scary, it’s something that has always intrigued me.

Unfortunately, times have changed and this article goes to talk about that. It’s entitled “New era of Western wildfire demands new ways of protecting people, ecosystems” from the University of Colorado at Boulder over at ScienceDaily.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian