Archive for the ‘Forests’ Category

Summer heat = dull fall colors

So unfortunately this is another one of those articles that you need to have an account for but as usual, I will tell you, you can go to your local library and look for the October 14-15 weekend edition of the Wall Street Journal and read it there.

Anyway, the article is entitled “Leave It to the Heat to Dull Autumn’s Glory” by Jo Craven McGinty at the Wall Street Journal. I know from what I’ve seen around here so far, fall might be a little dull in St. Louis.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

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Ancient forest

I saw this story over on NBC and I thought it was so cool. What is cool though isn’t just the fact that it’s there but that these fisherman actually pursued this to begin with. The story is entitled “The Unveiling of an Ancient Underwater Forest off Alabama Coast” by Kerry Sanders. As someone who loves trees, I also love all forests.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Berries

Reading this article I was reminded of when I was a kid and we use to play in the woods. There was this field that unfortunately is now houses but, back then it was full of berries.

These days if I’m looking for berries we do so when we’re up at our cabin. We can usually find them along the dirt road that leads to our cabin.

Anyway, the article that took back to my childhood is entitled “Tasting the Sweetness of Summer, Berry by Berry” by Hope Jahrenaug over at the New York Times. Back to a place where time didn’t always matter.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

In wildness is the preservation of the world

So I’ll admit it, I didn’t know that July 12, 2017 is the 200th birthday of Henry David Thoreau but like so much of my life these days, I seem to stumble upon what I need, when I need it.

This article, entitled “Thoreau’s Wilderness Legacy, Beyond the Shores of Walden Pond ” by Douglas Brinkley over at the New York Times is what I ran into today. Happy (belated) Birthday Henry! I think it’s time to take a walk.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Wildfires

I must admit over the years of writing I’ve always been fascinated with wildfires. What they do in the sense of death and re-birth to the land. I think the first book I read on wildfires was Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Conners.

Tonight I have two more articles on the topic. They are entitled “How a Wildfire Kicked Up a 45,000-foot Column of Flames ” by Kyle Dickman over at Popular Science and “Great Plains Wildfires Used to be Rare. Not Anymore” by John Upton at The Grist. The reality is that they are becoming more the norm.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Back in my youth

This is a story that took me back to my youth. When it seemed like you could go wherever you wanted when you played. Down the sidewalk to the woods and the creek in which we played in every summer.

Now it seems like everywhere is off limits. There are no trespassing signs wherever you look. Down in the creeks and on the fence along by the woods. To me, this article entitled “Allemansratten, the Swedish Right to Roam the Countryside, is Guaranteed by the Constitution” by Melissa Bryer at Treehugger, gives me hope that perhaps all is not lost, at least in Sweden.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

New Fire Season

So whenever I see an article on forest fires, I’m reminded of the book I read a few years ago entitled “Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout” by Philip Conners. I must admit that while it sounds scary, it’s something that has always intrigued me.

Unfortunately, times have changed and this article goes to talk about that. It’s entitled “New era of Western wildfire demands new ways of protecting people, ecosystems” from the University of Colorado at Boulder over at ScienceDaily.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian