Archive for the ‘Forests’ Category

In wildness is the preservation of the world

So I’ll admit it, I didn’t know that July 12, 2017 is the 200th birthday of Henry David Thoreau but like so much of my life these days, I seem to stumble upon what I need, when I need it.

This article, entitled “Thoreau’s Wilderness Legacy, Beyond the Shores of Walden Pond ” by Douglas Brinkley over at the New York Times is what I ran into today. Happy (belated) Birthday Henry! I think it’s time to take a walk.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Wildfires

I must admit over the years of writing I’ve always been fascinated with wildfires. What they do in the sense of death and re-birth to the land. I think the first book I read on wildfires was Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Conners.

Tonight I have two more articles on the topic. They are entitled “How a Wildfire Kicked Up a 45,000-foot Column of Flames ” by Kyle Dickman over at Popular Science and “Great Plains Wildfires Used to be Rare. Not Anymore” by John Upton at The Grist. The reality is that they are becoming more the norm.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Back in my youth

This is a story that took me back to my youth. When it seemed like you could go wherever you wanted when you played. Down the sidewalk to the woods and the creek in which we played in every summer.

Now it seems like everywhere is off limits. There are no trespassing signs wherever you look. Down in the creeks and on the fence along by the woods. To me, this article entitled “Allemansratten, the Swedish Right to Roam the Countryside, is Guaranteed by the Constitution” by Melissa Bryer at Treehugger, gives me hope that perhaps all is not lost, at least in Sweden.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

New Fire Season

So whenever I see an article on forest fires, I’m reminded of the book I read a few years ago entitled “Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout” by Philip Conners. I must admit that while it sounds scary, it’s something that has always intrigued me.

Unfortunately, times have changed and this article goes to talk about that. It’s entitled “New era of Western wildfire demands new ways of protecting people, ecosystems” from the University of Colorado at Boulder over at ScienceDaily.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Family of trees

Okay, it’s been a while since I’ve posted and it was because of technical issues. To start back up, I’m still reading the book, The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben and right now he’s talking about how important it is for trees to grow straight. So when I saw this article, I wanted to read it.

The article is entitled “In Poland’s Crooked Forest, a Mystery with No Straight Answer” by Joanna Klein at the New York Times. Hopefully I’ll find the answer. That’s what we librarians do.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

Tree day

Okay, for most people this (or was) Thursday but me it’s Tree day. Why you ask? Well, first I went on my daily walk at lunch to the local library and came across the book The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben.

I’ve just read the foreword but I like what I’ve read. You can read about the author and his book in the article entitled “German Forest Ranger Finds That Trees Have Social Networks, Too” by

Then I came across this article at work today entitled “Scientists report why forests with more tree types grow better, faster over at the West Fargo Pioneer. Of course the article comes from Duluth, Minnesota, where our family has gone on vacation for the last couple of years and where there are lots of trees!

Enjoy!

   

Green Librarian

Forest language

Now if watching the trees in the forest change colors isn’t your think, then how about the language of the forest? Okay, it isn’t quite what it seems. As a history buff, this article on what the author describes as a language as old as the Vikings, peaked my interest.

The article, entitled “This forest language from the age of Vikings may soon disappear: Elfdalian is spoken by less than 2,500 people in Swedish town.” by Michael d’Estries over at the Mother Nature Network, is really about the people who live in this part of Sweden and the language they speak. Cool, at least to me!

Sweet dreams!

   

Green Librarian