Archive for the ‘Geology’ Category

On the rocks

As someone who has always been interested in solar power, I found it interesting that mother nature in her own way, is yet again one step ahead of us. This article is entitled “Vast Expanses of Rock on Earth’s Surface May Act Like a Natural Solar Panel” by Yasemin Saplakoglu over at Live Science. Just another enlightening idea, courtesy of mother nature.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

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Going down

Okay, so as a kid I had the chance to find and explore some caves but compared to this, they were simply pot holes. This cave, located in British Columbia, is humongous and at least to me, pretty cool.

Today’s article is entitled “A ‘Honking Big’ Cave in Canada Lures Geologists to Its Mouth: How did a hole large enough to fit the Statue of Liberty go undetected for so long?” by Emily S. Rueb over at the New York Times. Boy, if I were a kid today, I think I’d be heading first north and then south.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Science project

Back in the day, my daughter did a science project on the rocks of Northern Minnesota. While I probably did more than my fair share of the project, in part because I collected many of the rocks over the course of many years, I’ve always been fascinated by rocks and geology.

So tonight’s article brought back that science project, in large part because the rocks found on this island, didn’t belong there. The article is entitled “‘Impossible’ Rocks Found on Remote Volcanic Island” by Stephanie Pappas at Live Science. Nothing like a good mystery.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Greenland

So my first thought when I came across this article was, with so much rain, will Greenland lose its ice and maybe turn green or will it just add to the ice? Well, read the article and you be the judge. The article is entitled “It’s raining on Greenland’s ice sheet. That’s a big problem” by Eric Holthaus over at the Grist.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Rocks & stones

As someone who has always picked up rocks and stones wherever I go, they have always fascinated me. From the ones I’ve gotten on vacation up north in Minnesota (some of which were later used by my daughter for a Science Fair Project) to the one’s I’ve gotten whenever the kids and I went out in nature, many now sit in jars throughout our house.

Anyway, this article entitled “This ancient gemstone found in the Galapagos is baffling scientists” by Ilana Strauss over at Treehugger is just another example of how they continue to intrigue scientist as well. For me, they no doubt always will.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Nature in pictures

As someone who has only recently begun to focus on taking pictures of nature and all it holds, I really enjoyed this article entitled “The Magic of the Microscopic World” by Michael D. Lemonick over at Scientific American. As a photographer, I love see the details in nature. Sometimes they are simply amazing.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

 

One is the loneliest number

At least according to the band Three Dog Night but in this case it’s a lonely Sitka Spruce tree on Campbell Island, 400 hundred miles south of New Zealand. For scientist, it’s a prime example of what humans have done to the environment.

The article is entitled “Does the World’s ‘Loneliest’ Tree Mark the Start of a New Epoch” by Noel Kirkpatrick over at the Mother Nature Network. So far, it looks like only time will tell and that is very unfortunate.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian