Archive for the ‘Ice’ Category

Iceland

So several years ago, when I decided to go back to school for a bachelor’s degree in history at the University of Illinois at Edwardsville, my first and favorite instructor was from Iceland.

It was in that class where I learned about the history of Iceland. So tonight’s article,  about Iceland and it’s glaciers, is entitled “Documenting the Disappearing Glaciers of Iceland” by Jonathan Blaustein over at the New York Times.

I also learned years later after my dad died, that he had always wanted to go and teach a class in Iceland through Webster University, where he taught part-time and I later worked as a librarian.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Ice map

Just yesterday my mom, my daughter and I were talking about maps and how much we like them. This map unfortunately, is one that tells a sad story. The story is about how much ice were losing these days.

The article and the aforementioned map is entitled “Rainbow satellite image shows Antarctica’s ice fleeing into the ocean and can be found over at the Grist.We really need to find a better way because just like with my previous post, Fort McMurray, we’re losing a lot of really good stuff.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

18 types of frozen water?

When I came across this article, the first thought that went through my head is, there are seventeen types of frozen water? As a hockey fan, I’ve really only known one type of frozen water and that’s the kind they play hockey on.

The article is entited “A new form of frozen water? New study describes what could be the 18th known form of ice“, from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. So my new question is, is it solid enough to play hockey on?

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Ice stacking

Having been to Duluth, Minnesota this past summer and getting to hang out by lake Superior, I knew I had to post this video and then of course, I thought we need to go up there in the winter.

Okay, maybe not in the middle of winter but it would be fun, as evident by this article/video entitled “Watch hypnotic ‘ice stacking’ on Lake Superior” by Russell McLendon at Mother Nature Network.

The kids, my mom and I got to watch one of those huge freighters come in and that’s cool but, this was cool (or should I say cold) in a different way. It was all nature, no human’s were needed. That’s my kind of fun.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Reading trees

Some people read books, some read tea leaves but very few can read trees. Seems that dendroclimatologist Ulf Büntgen and his fellow researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL were able for the first time to reconstruct the summer temperatures in central Asia for the past 2,000 years.

This according to the article entitled “Old trees reveal Late Antique Little Ice Age (LALIA) around 1,500 years ago” at Science Daily. Wow, that’s some story!

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Canada & icicles

Only in Canada would they create an atlas on icicles. It was put together by Dr. Stephen Morris at the University of Toronto and a graduate student (now an instructor at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in Calgary) Dr. Anthony Chen.

You can read all about it in the article entitled “Winter’s Sculptures, a Drop at at Time” by James Gorman over at the New York Times. How cool is that (no pun intended)?

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Sledding all winter long

I got my daughter a sled for Christmas and so what happened? It hasn’t snowed since. I have to say I can’t remember a winter this brown.

I guess however, if we moved from the Midwest up to Edmonton, Alberta we might have a better chance of sledding. This according to Heather Smith at the Grist in her article entitled “This Edmonton Ice Path Would be Amazing“. Pardon the pun but would be so cool!

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Glaciers & ice

It seems you can’t go anywhere these days without reading about climate change. Just check out the evidence provided by our melting Glaciers in the article “What Happens with all the Organic Carbon Released from Melting Glaciers?” by Florida State University courtesy the Environmental News Network.

And if you think this hasn’t happened before, you don’t need to look any further for proof than about 2,400 feet below the ice in Antarctica according to this article, “Climate Change Could be Happening 2,400 feet under Antarctic Ice” over at the Grist by Liz Core?.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Glaciers & yaks

These are two words I have to say that I didn’t think I would ever see in the same sentence. The article is entitled “Bhutan’s Glaciers and Yak Herds are Shrinking” by Ben Orlove at Earthsky Voices.

What is even more interesting to me is that  the article itself is about  Ed Cook and Paul Krusic, both tree ring scientists, who were there only to take sample cores in the region.

So why’ll there were plenty of trees, unfortunately it seems,  both yaks and glaciers seem to be disappearing from the region.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

The climate around us

The more I read about climate change, the more I seem to learn. To me at least, these two stories were interesting pieces to the puzzle.

The first one is about how ocean currents play a role in our climate. I guess I knew that winds do but it didn’t really occur to me that oceans could too. The article is “Climate Change Caused by Ocean Currents, New Research Shows” by over at Inhabitat. I guess  when I think about it, what with how winds change, it seems so obvious.

The other article is on a topic that I would never have thought would contribute to the study of climate change, melting cave ice. The article is “Melting Cave Ice is Taking Ancient Climate Data with It” By Lucas Laursen at Scientific American.  Data is just everywhere.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian