Archive for the ‘Land’ Category

Early life on earth

I think it’s been ever since I read Richard Forte’s book Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet Worms: The Story of the Animals and Plants That Time Has Left Behind, where I became fascinated with how plants and animals have evolved over time. This article fits into that story well.

The article is entitled “Early life on Earth limited by enzyme” from University College London over at Science Daily. I also find it fascinating how this planet has changed along with them. Makes you wonder how those baby sea turtles have changed too?

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

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Land and sea

So about a month ago I wrote the post Mother earth’s main ingredients where I talked about what’s in our soil. Then I came across this article a few days ago, entitled “Scientists just discovered billions of organisms underneath the land and sea by Ilana Strauss over at Treehugger. Who knew!?

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Landmarks

So when I read this book review (actually two of them) for the book Landmarks by Robert Macfarlane, I was immediately taken back to my childhood. To the times we played in the woods and all the landmarks that were there. I’m reminded of the train tunnel, the open stony field and the grassy open field as well, which is now full of houses.

Anyway, the first review is over at the Wall Street Journal, which yes isn’t available unless you have a subscription. It’s entitled “Why You Can’t  Say Where You Are” by Tom Shippey. It’s also in the August 6-7, 2016 weekend edition of the Wall Street Journal.

I also happen to come across a review of the book over at the New York Time which is entitled “Review: ‘Landmarks’ a Book on Language and Landscape” by Sarah Lyall. Either way, it’s a great read and if you’re like me, will take you back to another time.

Enjoy!

     

Green Librarian

What is landscape?

I came across a review of this book today in the weekend Wall Street Journal but, unfortunately you have to have a subscription just to view it on their website. So I did the next best thing, I found a review of What is Landscape? over on the publishers page.

What made the original review interesting is that it was written by Tristian Gooley, the author of a book I’m reading right now, The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs (Which in the U.K.. is The Walker’s Guide to Outdoor Clues and signs).

As soon as I’m done with this book and the one that I’ve been reading for what seems like forever, Wales : epic views of a small country by Jan Morris, then I’ll get right to this book.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

 

Terrestrial to Oceanic

So what do those  two places have in common? Well here’s hoping that they will continue to have more and more. Especially if Caleb McClennen over at Scientific American has any thing to say about it. You can read all about it in the article “Let’s Expand Terrestrial Parks into the Ocean“.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Microbes are in the soil too!

I’ve learned a lot about microbes lately. First I discovered that they’re in the ocean. Today I learned about microbes in the soil. As they say, you learn something new every day. If you want to learn about them, check out the article “A Microscopic Issue of Unknown Consequences” by Henry Fountain at the New York Times.

You can also check out my previous post about them entitled “From the Top to the Bottom of the Ocean“. There everywhere, there everywhere. Who knew?

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Weekend tidbits

A few miscellanous tidbits regarding this weekend-

First up, if you’re in St. Louis this weekend then, head down to the Jefferson National Expansion  Memorial (better known at the Arch) to celebrate National Public Lands Day. 

I took my older kids down and we had a blast. We had a chance to do what they call geocacheing, checked out the orienteering booth along with seeing the mighty mississippi river. Here’s the website to see all of the days events.

While we’re on the topic of rivers, check out this article by Rebecca Wodder at Treehugger entitled “On World Rivers Day, Take Time to Appreciate What Rivers Give Us“.

I was also reminded today of a event in St. Louis this weekend entitled Green Homes & Renewable Energy Festival. While the educational and informational part is over (and we didn’t make it unfortunately), the house tour is tomorrow. Here’s the website for more on that. That probably would have helped with my solar panel project.

Last, here are three more articles that I’ve come across recently on a topic I blogged about a couple of days ago, bees. They are “Beeologics to Save US Honeybees with New Anti-Viral Medicine–Have a Colony to Share?” by Karin Kloosterman at Treehugger, “A Honey of a Season” by Joe Bonwich at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and “Local Beekeepers Could Boost Bee Population” by Georgina Gustin, also at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian


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