Archive for the ‘Migration’ Category

Bird migrations

A couple of weeks ago I got the chance to watch the movie Winged Migration and so reading tonight’s article gave me more insight into truly how difficult those migrations can be.

The article is entitled “How do hurricanes affect birds? Research project tracks how storms modify birds’ migrations” by Tom Oder at Mother News Network. After watching the video and reading the article, it’s simply incredible how they do it, adjusting as they need to along the way.

After reading all the news about Hurricane Dorian this past week and it really shows you how amazing migration is. As soon as I finish reading the book Buzz: The Nature and Necessity of Bees by Thor Hanson, I need to start North on the Wing by Bruce Beehler. So many books, so little time.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Advertisements

Birds, birds, birds

As someone who loves migrations, there is one story in which I haven’t covered up to this point, the Cranes and their migration. It’s actually one in which cuts across the Midwest along the Platte River in Nebraska.

Both the short article and video here, entitled “Video: Cranes Draw Global Attention to Central Nebraska One of World’s Greatest Migrations” over at the Kearney Hub, give some great background to this amazing migration that generally happens from late March to early April.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Flying with the birds

When my kids were younger, Fly Away Home, was one of our favorite movies so when I came across this article on a man who flies with the birds in order to save them, it was an obvious choice.

Tonight’s article is entitled “Meet the Man Who Flies with the Birds in Order to Save Them” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. I’m also a huge fan of migration tales, so to ride with this gentleman would be awesome.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

Confluence

I must admit I forget that I live and work near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, the two biggest rivers in the United States and they meet right here in the Midwest.

The article here tonight is entitled “Trumpeter Swans’ Population Comeback on Full Display at the Confluence” by Bryce Gray over at our own St. Louis Post-Dispatch. It’s nice to talk about people here in St. Louis making a difference, one bird at a time.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

150 Migration paths (simultaneously)

So I written several post’s on the migration paths of various animals but here’s an article and video that talk about and show the migration paths for 150 animals, all at the same time. The article is entitled “Watch 150 Animal Species Roam the Globe in This Amazing Migration Animation” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger.

There is also a link in the article to Movebank, an online database of animal tracking data where researchers can share their data. I think the article does a really nice job of showing how other species work in harmony with the planet, rather than against it.

Sincerely-

       

Green Librarian

Monarchs

So I recently read and I need to go back to find the article, hopefully this weekend, which came to mind when I remembered seeing a monarch a few weeks back and wondering why so early? Well, according to that article, monarchs we’re being spotted here earlier than usual and the problem with that is that the milkweed plants here aren’t in bloom yet.

Anyway, since I don’t have that article in front of me, I’m going with this article over at Scientific American entitled “Monarchs in Peril: There Numbers have been Declining Dramatically, but Figuring Out Exactly Why – and What to Do About it- is the Challengeby Anurag Agrawal. Here’s hoping they find an answer and I find the article that talks about Monarchs here in this region.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Heading south

Well, I’m always up for a migration story but this time, were talking about one that took place thousands of years ago right here in North America. That’s according the article entitled “Ancient Bones Spark Fresh Debate over First Humans in the Americas:A study of remains found in southern California puts an unknown human species in the New World more than 100,000 years earlier than expected—but critics aren’t buying it” by Kate Wong at Scientific American.

In some ways, it’s a follow up to another article entitled “First humans arrived in North America a lot earlier than believed“ from the Universite de Montreal over at Science Daily. This is an article talks about some human regarding the Yukon region in Canada while the first article talks about some mastodon bones that were found further south in San Diego.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian