Archive for the ‘Naturalist’ Category

Words for nature

Now I came across today’s article from a blog I’d honestly never heard of before called Writeshop. I happened upon it as I was creating a display at work for the December theme Write to a Friend Month.

The article, entitled “How to make word banks about nature” by and it reminded me of an older post I did about the words we have for nature and how these days, they seem to be disappearing.

Unfortunately, I can’t remember for the life of me the article I’m referring to but when I do, I will remember to post it. Okay, update, I did find the post. It’s entitled “What is landscape?“. Enjoy!

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Thoreau

So tonight I have another post about Thoreau and his 200th birthday but unfortunately it’s over at the Wall Street Journal, so unless you have an online account with the Wall Street Journal, it can be found at your local library in the July 15-16 weekend edition.

The article is entitled “Thoreau at 200” by Randall Fuller over at the Wall Street Journal. It’s definitely worth the time to read. If not, you can go back to my earlier post entitled In Wildness is the Preservation of the World. Or you can just go read Thoreau’s book Walden. Anyway you look at it, you can’t lose.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

In wildness is the preservation of the world

So I’ll admit it, I didn’t know that July 12, 2017 is the 200th birthday of Henry David Thoreau but like so much of my life these days, I seem to stumble upon what I need, when I need it.

This article, entitled “Thoreau’s Wilderness Legacy, Beyond the Shores of Walden Pond ” by Douglas Brinkley over at the New York Times is what I ran into today. Happy (belated) Birthday Henry! I think it’s time to take a walk.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Happenstance

I came upon this article simply by happenstance. It makes me think back to a time when I played in the woods as a kid and makes me wonder how we were able to always find our way back.

Maybe in some way, we had our own trail trees or markers but didn’t necessarily know it. It’s something I’m trying to pass on to my kids in a way as well. To use trees and other natural objects as trail markers.

The article is entitled “Trail trees are a living Native American legacy” by Laura Moss over at the Mother Nature Network. Meanwhile, keep on walking.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

North by northwest to Alaska

I have to say that when I picked up the book Naturalist at Sea: From Dampier to Darwin by Glyn Williams, I wasn’t sure what I was getting into but up to this point, I think I made a good choice.

In fact, I’m only into the second chapter, Ten Years of Preparation; Ten Hours of Exploration: The Alaskan Tribulations of Georg Wilhelm Steller, but I’ve learned so much about the northwest.

In fact, when I recently read the article “How the 1964 Alaska Earthquake Shook Up Scienceby Becky Oskin at LiveScience,  my interest in the region was only piqued more. I turns out that this year is the fiftieth anniversary of that earthquake.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian