Archive for the ‘Oceans’ Category

Ocean blue

Okay, here’s another one of those articles which I am recommending that is over at the Wall Street Journal.  Unfortunately you will need either a subscription to the Journal online or you can hop on down to your local library and look for the Review Section of the March 11-12 weekend edition page C4.

The article is entitled “Why Is the Ocean Blue? We know that water is transparent and colorless, so what accounts for its color? Think of it as a big game of molecular pinball” by Helen Czerski. Another option however would be to check out her book Storm in a Teacup: The physics of everyday life , which came out last year. I just requested it myself.

Sail away!

   

Green Librarian

Cape Cod & great whites

I’ve been to Cape Cod only once and I have some really fond memories of the place. Now it sounds like great whites sharks like it too, at least according to the numbers. You can read about them in this article entitled “Cape Cod’s Great White Shark Population May Be Growing” by Stephanie Pappas over at Live Science. I would love to visit again!

Swimmingly-

   

Green Librarian

Lost Continent

It always amazes me what science is able to discover. In this case, it’s how they’re able to discover a piece of a lost continent under the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius through the discovery of a rock known as zircons. I’ll be the first to admit, I’ve never heard of it.

Anyway, the article is entitled “3-Billion-Year-Old ‘Lost Continent’ Lurking Under African Island” by Tia Ghose over at LiveScience. Reminds me, I need to go back and check out the book Roadside Geology of Missouri by Charles G. Spencer. Next stop, the library.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Blue day

Okay, so it wasn’t a blue day today but that sort of leads me to the topic of my article (maybe two) on blue whales. The first article is entitled “How Do You Dismantle a 90-Ton Whale? Start With a Strong Stomach and a Machete: When the corpses of two blue whales floated into two Newfoundland seashore villages, it presented a rare research opportunity; ‘I was totally slimed’” by Jacquie McNish but unfortunately it’s over at the Wall Street Journal. Since that usually requires a subscription, may I suggest that you run over to your local library and read it? It’s in the January 2, 2017 issue.

The second article however, is free and entitled “11 facts about blue whales, the largest animals ever known to live on Earth by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. I must say, while the first article gives you lots of in-depth information, this second article is sort of the short and sweet version of whales.

Now if all else fails, you can also go to your library and check out the kids book entitled Billy Twitters and His Blue Whale Problem by Mac Barnett (Author) and Adam Rex (Illustrator). Whew, that was a whale full!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Nautilus

Shortly after I graduated in from the University of Oklahoma with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education back in 1985, I got my first job working at the St. Louis Community College at Meramec as an instructor in their fitness center teaching students how to use their  nautilus equipment.

Fast forward to just over thirty years and here I am writing a post about nautilus, not the fitness equipment but, the beautiful chambered cephalopod for whose shape the equipment is designed upon. Who knew?!

Anyway, tonight I came across an article over at the Center for Biological Diversity on a petition they submitted to the National Marine Fisheries Service asking for the nautilus to be given protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Then being the research librarian that I am today, I searched to find some more articles on this topic and low and behold, I came across the group Save the Nautilus. How cool is that?

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Whale of a story

This article reminded me of the book The whale : in search of the giants of the sea by Philip Hoare , a book that really started my love of whales. The article is entitled “When Whales Started Living Large: A new study tracks ‘the rise of ocean giants’“by Brian Switek over on the Laelaps blog at Scientific American. I also highly recommend the book.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Mollusks & dinosaurs

Again, two animals I would have never put together. Similar I guess to what they do by studying tree rings to get an idea of what was happening on land, a group of researchers from the University of Florida and the University of Michigan have been doing a little dating, using the shells of the Mollusks in the ocean to also get an idea of what was happening on land.

The article is entitled “The demise of the dinosaurs found recorded in ancient mollusks: Researchers discover evidence of a one-two punch of climate change” by Michael d’Estries over at the Mother Nature Network. It always amazing me how they’re able to work backwards and look at what was happening millions of years ago.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian