Archive for the ‘Rivers’ Category

Mighty Mississippi

So as this article states, I’m one of those people who lives within 100 miles of the Mighty Mississippi. In fact, I work not more than a mile or so away from this majestic river. I’ve also lived through (while sandbagging to help others) a few of those floods, including the one back in 1993 , that many people called the 100 year flood.

One of the things I remember around that time was an article I found which was written by a professor across this same river over in Illinois (whose name and school I can’t remember) that stated this 100 year flood is actually more like a 15 year flood. Meaning this size of flood occurs more like every 15 years, rather than 100 years.

So I wasn’t surprised when I read this article entitled “Engineers Tried to Tame the Mississippi River. They Only Made Flooding Worse.” by Adam Rogers over at the Grist. Meanwhile, I need to go back and look for that study.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

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Mental health & blue space

So according to this article and I would say from personal experience as well, it appears that living near water is good for your mental health. I know I’m only around water one week of each year and that’s when we’re on vacation at our cabin on Town Line Lake in Minnesota, but I definitely feel more relaxed there the longer we are at the cabin.

The article that apparently supports this theory is entited “Living Near Water Boosts Mental Health” by Katherine Martinko over at Treehugger. So the next time you’re surrounded by water, see if you’re not more relaxed.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Rivers & the law

As a law librarian and an environmentalist, I found this article rather fascinating. The river is the Colorado River and the law is, well, the law. The article is entitled “Does a River have a Right to Life” by Reed Benson over at High Country News. My hope is as Reed Benson states, “Someday, a river in this nation may have a right to life“.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Nature at it’s finest

So this article, at least to me, show’s nature at it’s fines despite what some human’s continue to do to this planet. The article is entitled “The Amargosa River Defies the Desert” by Jim Robbins over at the New York Times. This river in the middle of a desert and all the animals that live within it’s ecosystem, simply amazing.

Sincerely-

       

Green Librarian

Confluence

I must admit I forget that I live and work near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, the two biggest rivers in the United States and they meet right here in the Midwest.

The article here tonight is entitled “Trumpeter Swans’ Population Comeback on Full Display at the Confluence” by Bryce Gray over at our own St. Louis Post-Dispatch. It’s nice to talk about people here in St. Louis making a difference, one bird at a time.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Canoeing

I will be the first to admit that I’ve never done a lot of canoeing except for a few times on our lake at the family cabin. That said however, I must admit it’s something that I’ve always admired other people doing.

So when I saw this article on a short documentary (originally filmed as a commercial), I found myself again drawn. The article is entitled “This Canoe Documentary is Almost too Beautiful to Watch ” by Michael D’Estries over at the Mother Nature Network. Unfortunately my computer isn’t that great so I will have to watch the rest of it this weekend.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

 

Lost beach

As I sat and watch the Mississippi river during the latest round of floods here in Missouri this past spring, I’m reminded how no matter what humans do to the river (i.e. dams, levies, etc…) when she wants something, mother nature just goes and takes it.

In this case, it was a beach on Achill Island, located off the coast of Ireland in 1984. Then suddenly it was returned this past April. You can read about it in the article entitled “Lost Irish beach returns after 33 years: A freak tide just returned more than 1,000 feet of sand wiped out by a brutal winter storm on Achill Island” by Michael d’Estries over at Mother Nature Network.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian