Archive for the ‘Scientist’ Category

One is the loneliest number

At least according to the band Three Dog Night but in this case it’s a lonely Sitka Spruce tree on Campbell Island, 400 hundred miles south of New Zealand. For scientist, it’s a prime example of what humans have done to the environment.

The article is entitled “Does the World’s ‘Loneliest’ Tree Mark the Start of a New Epoch” by Noel Kirkpatrick over at the Mother Nature Network. So far, it looks like only time will tell and that is very unfortunate.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Canoeing

I will be the first to admit that I’ve never done a lot of canoeing except for a few times on our lake at the family cabin. That said however, I must admit it’s something that I’ve always admired other people doing.

So when I saw this article on a short documentary (originally filmed as a commercial), I found myself again drawn. The article is entitled “This Canoe Documentary is Almost too Beautiful to Watch ” by Michael D’Estries over at the Mother Nature Network. Unfortunately my computer isn’t that great so I will have to watch the rest of it this weekend.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

 

Rogue (citizen) science

Call it what you will but, watching science go rogue (or citizen) has been fun to say the least. It started out with the Badlands National Park and has now spread to several government science groups creating their own twitter accounts to make sure their information is out there for the public.

Check out this article entitled “Government science goes rogue on Twitter” by David Morgan over at CBS News. Who knows what’s next?

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

Mapping the ocean blue

Yes shark week is over and even though my kids, my mom and myself had a great discussion about it yesterday morning over breakfast, the place they call home is still the place we know the least about. If Google and some scientist have a say in it however, that’s about to change.

They have joined together to start mapping the coral reefs and other parts of the oceans. In large part to help us protect this world in which we know so little about. The article and video are entitled “Explore the World’s Coral Reefs with Google Street View” by Tanya Lewis at LiveScience.

Good night!

 

Green Librarian

 

The marching scientists

I have to say that when I read this article about the marching scientist, I was like “wow”. Fast forward to today however and it seems that fit right in. Anyway, the article is entitled “In Rocky Mountains, It’s Hooray For the Red, White, Blue and Green: Scientists in Fourth of July Parade Wear Foliage—Some With Nothing Else’ by Julia Harte over at the Wall Street Journal.

I must add though that I’m reading the book Letters to a Young Scientist (in my second attempt) by Edward O. Wilson and knowing what I’ve learned about the author, I’m not completely surprised by what was going on with this group. If your interested in learning more about the folks over at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, check out their website.

Good Stuff!

 

Green Librarian

Self-taught geologist

So  I really didn’t have much write when I first sat down so I went out the the living room and started reading, which that usually helps. Tonight was no exception as I came across an interesting book review in the Science section of the New York Times entitled “Science on His Own Terms” by Michael Pollak. It’s about a scientist that as the article states, is self-taught.

So shortly after I read the article, I requested the book. Stay tune!

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Darwin et al.

So here’s another topic that I’ve been meaning to write about for quite some time, Charles Darwin. The article I came across tonight is entitled “Why Climate Change has Darwin Down for the Count” by Chris Mooney over at the Grist.

While I haven’t really found one good book on him, I’ve learned a lot about both him and his counterpart, Alfred Russell Wallace in several of the books I’ve read lately including one of the two I’m reading right now entitled Letters to a Young Scientist by Edward O. Wilson.

When I get the chance, I will add it to my Green Reading page because they were really two amazing scientist.

Enjoy!

 

Green Librarian

Getting dirty in the name of science

So the kids and I decided to get dirty this weekend on the road to becoming young (and old) scientist but not in the usual way. Instead of going outside, we actually stayed inside with one kilogram of dirt from the Mastodon Matrix Project.

Now while it’s true that this dirt has been sitting around for quite a while (in our house, as well as, deep under a pond in New York), we finally got around to sifting through it with our hands to see what was in it.

What we found mostly were a few sticks, a couple of possible shells and even some roots or what we hoped were hair. In order to know for sure, we’re going to send it back, as per the instructions and follow that up with filling out the Mastodon Matrix Project Worksheet. So stay tune to see what we’ve found!

And if you want to get involved, then head on over to the Mastodon Matrix Project website or visit the SciStarter website for this and other possible projects. Meanwhile, I need to go back and see if I can find the information I had on a project on Whale songs. After playing in the dirt, I think it’s time we get a little wet!

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Back to the future (of science)

To follow up on my earlier Future of science post, I found a couple more articles on science, one looking forward and one back. The first article is entitled “Cracking Open the Scientific Process” by Thomas Lin over at the New York Times. It talks about the current role of the web and it’s affect on scientific research. It does seem to be where it’s headed.

The second article looks back at an institution that has played an important role in science, having first been founded back in 1660 and located across the pond, the Royal Society. Like those within the scientific research community, it’s attempting to stay relevant. The article is entitled “A Redoubt of Learning Holds Firm” by Michael Powell, also at the New York Times.

Happy Friday!

 

Green Librarian

The future of science

The other day I received another e-mail from SciStarter, a website dedicated to citizen scientist and as that is one of my passions, I thought I would pass along the link. It’s a great place to get involved in the world of science, even if your not a scientist by trade.

That e-mail also reminded me of a recent article over at the New York Times entitled “A Laboratory Grows Young Scientist” by Ethan Hauser. So while my kids and many like them try their hands at their local Science Fair, who knows where the next young scientist’s might come from. Hmmm…

Enjoy!

 

Green Librarian