Archive for the ‘Skies’ Category

Cloudy days

Now one of my favorite things to do on any given days, is to do watch the clouds go by. The fact that I work in a tall building, over looking the Mississippi river, makes it even more fun.

That’s what made reading this article, “Take time to look at the clouds” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger, so much fun to read. Just yesterday I took this picture just after the rain cut short my son’s golf tournament, sponsored by St. Louis Arc.

Clouds

Also, if you get the chance, check out the book The Cloudspotter’s Guide by Gavin Pretor-Pinney over on the Cloud Appreciation Society’s website. A great read and one I realized I need to add to my  Green Reading list (which I just did).

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

 

 

Advertisements

The stars around us

So this is just one of those cool stories (at least to me) about this planet and how the skies around us can affect us. According to this article, these glassy pearls in these ancient clams actually have a bit of outer space in them.

The article is entitled “Ancient clams give forth glassy pearls that came from outer spaceby Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. Just such a neat story about the world around us.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Looking up at the moon

I must say that over the last few nights, I’ve found myself not only outside for a bit but, also looking up at the moon while I wait patiently for another full moon. Anyway, when ever I get the chance, I enjoy reading and posting articles on the night sky.

So tonight’s article is one entitled “Losing the Night Sky” by Caroline Crampton over at a website entitled How We Get to Next. I would also be remiss if I don’t mention the book entitled The End of Night by Paul Bogard.

It’s the book that got me started on this journey of the night sky. That and our annual family vacations to our cabin in northern Minnesota, where we are always guaranteed to see a sky full of stars at least a few nights.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

What’s under our feet

So the book I’m reading right now is entitled The Ground Beneath Us, the second book I’ve read by Paul Bogard and ironically it’s around the same time of year as when I read his first one. When we’re getting ready to go on vacation to our cabin in Minnesota, which it turns out is where he’s from.

When I read his first book, entitled The End of Night, it really rang a bell because our cabin is about three and half hours north of the twin cities which gives us the gift of very dark nights and lots of stars. Something I can never get around here in St. Louis.

While that connection isn’t there, I still find this book every bit as interesting, since I too  have often wondered what’s under out feet. As someone who was born in Iowa (one of the many states he covers in this book) and who in fact has relatives there, which we will be visiting, I will perhaps find myself a little more observant this time around while on their farm.

Anyway, I’m hoping to finish the book while we’re up in Minnesota, where I lived as well for a short time and can’t wait to visit again. For both the stars above and the ground below.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

 

 

 

 

Steve

So I can’t say I’ve ever written a post entitled with my name. Anyway, whenever I think of stars, I think of our cabin up north and the skies up there that when I look up, I always think that the skies are so full of stars that there’s not room for one more.

Anyway, that’s about as close as I’ll probably ever get to the Aurora Lights. That said, I just came across this article about these new northern lights called Steve, I kid you not. The article is entitled “Meet ‘Steve’, a New Kind of Northern Lights Discovered by Aurora Chasers” by Kimberley Mok over at Treehugger. There’s even a video. How cool is that?!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Archaeology of the stars

I must say when I look out at the stars, I don’t really think about what elements make up those stars.  Reading this article however, opened my eyes to the stars and how they are not all the same.

The article is entitled as my post suggests, “The Archaeology of the Stars” by Curtis Brainard over at the New York Times. So the next time I look up at the stars, I’ll remember each one is unique in it’s makeup, really just like human’s.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

Dark in the night

Reading this article today entitled “The First Dark Sky Reserve in the U.S. is a Stargazer’s Paradise” by Michael E’stries over at the Mother Nature Network just got me more excited about dark skies, that and the Wolf Moon that happened the other night.

You see I just got my first good camera, a Nikon D3400 and so now I’m really looking forward to taking pictures at night of the moon and the stars, not to mention the rest of mother nature. I don’t know how well I’ll do but wish me luck!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian