Archive for the ‘Stars’ Category

Meteorites in Missouri

So this story was all over the local news recently as a meteorite was believed to have struck Warren County, Missouri last night. As someone who has always looked up to the sky, particularly when we’re up in northern Minnesota, I found this story incredibly fascinating.

The article is entitled “Scientists think there may be meteorites in this Missouri pasture. The hunt is on” by over at our local newspaper, the  What I wouldn’t give to go and take a look for the meteorite myself.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Bat highway

So, I’m reading this article but I can’t for the life of me think of the book I read a few years ago on night skies and light pollution that this reminds me of but, course just as I say that, I find it. The book is called The End of Night by Paul Bogard.

I’m always happy to find an article about another way that human’s are trying to reduce light pollution to benefit nature. Tonight’s article is entitled “The UK is getting its first bat highway!” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. Can’t wait to see the first bat highway here in the U.S.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Circle around the sun

Circle round the sun“, to quote an old Poi Dog Pondering song, “turn, turn, turn“. What a great song! Anyway, I’ve always been fascinated by solar flares and shockwaves.

So today’s article, “For the first time, scientists capture a shockwave bursting from the sun” by Christian Cotroneo over at Mother News Network was a great read. Especially on a day like today, where the sun was nowhere to be found except in a gorgeous sunset.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

The stars around us

So this is just one of those cool stories (at least to me) about this planet and how the skies around us can affect us. According to this article, these glassy pearls in these ancient clams actually have a bit of outer space in them.

The article is entitled “Ancient clams give forth glassy pearls that came from outer spaceby Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. Just such a neat story about the world around us.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Asteroids

I must admit, despite all of the family vacations we took out west over the years when I was a kid, to the best of my knowledge we never saw a crater. It’s actually only been since we got our family cabin that I think I really began to wonder about space and what is out there.

So I found this article quite interesting about asteroids and the apparent increased frequency of them, according to this article entitled “We are living in an era of high frequency asteroid strikes” by Bryan Nelson over at Mother Nature Network.

Sort of reminds me, in a strange sort of way, how we’re way past the average time between an eruptions at Yellowstone National Park. Kind of scary when you think about it.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Looking up at the moon

I must say that over the last few nights, I’ve found myself not only outside for a bit but, also looking up at the moon while I wait patiently for another full moon. Anyway, when ever I get the chance, I enjoy reading and posting articles on the night sky.

So tonight’s article is one entitled “Losing the Night Sky” by Caroline Crampton over at a website entitled How We Get to Next. I would also be remiss if I don’t mention the book entitled The End of Night by Paul Bogard.

It’s the book that got me started on this journey of the night sky. That and our annual family vacations to our cabin in northern Minnesota, where we are always guaranteed to see a sky full of stars at least a few nights.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

What’s under our feet

So the book I’m reading right now is entitled The Ground Beneath Us, the second book I’ve read by Paul Bogard and ironically it’s around the same time of year as when I read his first one. When we’re getting ready to go on vacation to our cabin in Minnesota, which it turns out is where he’s from.

When I read his first book, entitled The End of Night, it really rang a bell because our cabin is about three and half hours north of the twin cities which gives us the gift of very dark nights and lots of stars. Something I can never get around here in St. Louis.

While that connection isn’t there, I still find this book every bit as interesting, since I too  have often wondered what’s under out feet. As someone who was born in Iowa (one of the many states he covers in this book) and who in fact has relatives there, which we will be visiting, I will perhaps find myself a little more observant this time around while on their farm.

Anyway, I’m hoping to finish the book while we’re up in Minnesota, where I lived as well for a short time and can’t wait to visit again. For both the stars above and the ground below.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian