Archive for the ‘Stars’ Category

Dark skies and light pollution

So after doing a little research, like we librarians like to do, I was able to find the book I mentioned yesterday. The book is entitled The End of Night by Paul Bogard and I highly recommend it. I’ve also included it on the green reading page.

FYI, I also found out he has a new book entitled The Ground Beneath Us. I’ll let you know how that is as I just requested it this morning.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Dark skies

So excuse me if you heard this one. I thought I posted this article before but maybe I haven’t. One of my favorite things about the earth is actually the night sky. I love it when we’re up north on vacation and you can look at the sky.

I’ve often said to my kids that the sky looks so full of stars, like you couldn’t stick another one up there because there’s no room. Anyway, the article is entitled “The World’s 11 Certified Dark Sky Reserves, Where the Stars Run Riot ” by Melissa Bryer over at Treehugger.

When I read this article it actually reminded me of a book I read at the library a few years back but I can’t for the life of me remember the title. Perhaps that’s a re-post for another night. First I need to go back and find the book.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Meteors or fireballs

I’ll be the first to admit, I’ve never heard the term fireballs as it relates to meteors. I will say however, that my youngest and I got up in the early morning hours last year to see the Perseids meteor showers. While we weren’t up long, just a couple of minutes, I think that’s the first time for me (and I’m sure for him) to see a meteor.

Anyway, apparently the northern spring is also fireball season. This is according to the article entitled “Northern spring is fireball season” over at Earthsky. You can also check out their Meteor Shower Guide for 2016. Good stuff!

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

North star

So it seems that even the Navy agrees that maybe it’s a good thing to learn to navigate using the stars. I guess it’s sort of a back up plan in case their GPS goes on the fritz.

While I love technology as much as the next person, after all I couldn’t be writing this blog post without it, sometimes the best things in life are free. Like the stars or sun that can tell you which way is north or that landmark tree that you use to know where to turn next.

The article is entitled “Navy to resume navigating by the stars” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. See, nature definitely has it advantages.

Good night!

  

Green Librarian

I love surprises!

Sometimes it’s when or where you least expect to find it. This article for example, entitled “Discovering Nature at Night” by Dan Zarlenga in the latest issue of Missouri Conservationist is my latest surprise.

Anyway, I had this issue stuffed in my backpack on the way to work and was just looking to take a break from my book (yes, the same one on Wales that I mentioned in an earlier post, What is Landscape?).

Anyway, I knew as soon as I found the article, I had to read it, as well as post it. Unfortunately I can’t look at the stars tonight but maybe tomorrow. I’m really excited about the full moon on Christmas. I can’t wait!

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Nighttime

As I was driving around tonight, there was a really nice view of some nighttime cumulus clouds heading east. I tried several times to take a picture of the evening sky and while it’s not a great picture, I was happy with it (see below).

NightTimeSky2

Nothing however, compared to the picture in the article that accompanies the article entitled “We’re Losing the Nighttime Sky” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger. It’s time to take back our nighttime sky.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Star dust and us

Recently I’ve been telling my kids, when we’re out at night and  looking at the stars, we’re all really just made of star dust. This is something that I’ve heard Astrophysicist Neil Degrasse Tyson talk about on NOVA.

Now while that’s not what this article is about, it’s what’s moved me to write about it tonight. The article is entitled “10 cool things about stars” by Larry Sessions over at EarthSky. Unfortunately, the fact Dr. Tyson points out isn’t on the list. Maybe it should be 11 Cool things about Stars.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Star light, star bright…

To me stars are simply amazing. My fondest memories of them are up at our family cabin in the north woods. When you look up in the sky, it just looks so crowded.

While it’s not the same here in the Missouri, it does seems that lately that the view has been good.So when I came across this article, “New Data Shows Stars are Younger than Previously Thought” over at the Environmental News Network, I thought wow!

Sleep tight!

 

Green Librarian

As the nights get brighter

I get planet guides from time to time courtesy of the great people over at Earthsky and usually I just sort scanned them over but this month (after seeing the “January 2015 Guide to the Five Visible Planets“) I actually got some great glimpses. I might have even seen Saturn.

First on my metrolink ride and then in the car on the way home. I also saw a few nice shots of the moon and even one or two the stars outside my house.

Sweet!

 

Green Librarian

Night lights

So I finished The End of Night by Paul Bogard last week and now I’m on to my next book but while I was reading that book, I came across this interesting article in Time magazine.

The article is entitled “Finding God in the Dark” by Elizabeth Dias. Unfortunately this article isn’t available online without a subscription. It is well worth the read.

Sleep tight!

 

Green Librarian