Archive for the ‘Stones’ Category

Going down

Okay, so as a kid I had the chance to find and explore some caves but compared to this, they were simply pot holes. This cave, located in British Columbia, is humongous and at least to me, pretty cool.

Today’s article is entitled “A ‘Honking Big’ Cave in Canada Lures Geologists to Its Mouth: How did a hole large enough to fit the Statue of Liberty go undetected for so long?” by Emily S. Rueb over at the New York Times. Boy, if I were a kid today, I think I’d be heading first north and then south.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Science project

Back in the day, my daughter did a science project on the rocks of Northern Minnesota. While I probably did more than my fair share of the project, in part because I collected many of the rocks over the course of many years, I’ve always been fascinated by rocks and geology.

So tonight’s article brought back that science project, in large part because the rocks found on this island, didn’t belong there. The article is entitled “‘Impossible’ Rocks Found on Remote Volcanic Island” by Stephanie Pappas at Live Science. Nothing like a good mystery.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

January

Now over my years of collecting rocks, I’ve seen the term birth stones many times but have never really known much about them. At least until I came across this article entitled “The Astonishing Origin of Garnets in Rhyolite” by Dana Hunter at Scientific American.

So for the next twelve months, I’m going to start learning about birth stones. I will say this article alone has been incredibly educational. Unfortunately my birth month is November, so I’ve got quite awhile until then.

Sincerely –

 

Green Librarian

Rocks tell a story

As someone who enjoys collecting rocks when out in nature, this article struck home with me. In fact, as I told my co-workers just today, my son once did a science fair project on the rocks of Minnesota. The reason they were from Minnesota is because that’s where our family cabin is, where we to each summer for vacation.

The article is entitled “Earthworms’ Castings: Rock Pile” by Jean Ponzi over at the The Healthy Planet. We still have those rocks scattered about the house. After all, they’re really part of the family.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Rocks & stones

As someone who has always picked up rocks and stones wherever I go, they have always fascinated me. From the ones I’ve gotten on vacation up north in Minnesota (some of which were later used by my daughter for a Science Fair Project) to the one’s I’ve gotten whenever the kids and I went out in nature, many now sit in jars throughout our house.

Anyway, this article entitled “This ancient gemstone found in the Galapagos is baffling scientists” by Ilana Strauss over at Treehugger is just another example of how they continue to intrigue scientist as well. For me, they no doubt always will.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Rocks & stones

I get the feeling that I’ve written another post with the same title but it was probably a few years ago. That said, I’ve always been attracted to rocks and stones. If you look around my house, you’ll find plenty of them.

Some from the from various river beds in the area but, most however, from up north in Minnesota around our cabin and that area. In fact, many years ago, my daughter did one of her science fair projects on the rocks up north.

That said, this article from over at Live Science entitled “1.6 Billion Year Old Breath of Life Frozen in Stone” by Stephanie Pappas reminds of some of those rocks and stones as I’ve just recently started to sort them and place them throughout the house.

In fact, I was just re-reading an article that gave me the idea of rewarding my kids by putting rocks in their own jars and rewarding them after they got so many rocks. It’s called “Don’t Lose Your Marbles” by Malissa O’Brian over at Family Fun Magazine. Those are some really good memories.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Stone work

Well, this is definitely, at least to me, a new use for stones. It seems that according to the article entitled “The Fly Larva That Thinks It’s a Stonemason: Caddisfly larvae build themselves a protective house of stones with some of the stickiest sticky tape on Earth” by Lydia Chain over at Scientific American, we have a fly that also does stone work. All I can add is, from what I can see in the picture with the article, they do nice work.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian