Archive for the ‘Trails’ Category

In wildness is the preservation of the world

So I’ll admit it, I didn’t know that July 12, 2017 is the 200th birthday of Henry David Thoreau but like so much of my life these days, I seem to stumble upon what I need, when I need it.

This article, entitled “Thoreau’s Wilderness Legacy, Beyond the Shores of Walden Pond ” by Douglas Brinkley over at the New York Times is what I ran into today. Happy (belated) Birthday Henry! I think it’s time to take a walk.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Trails

For as long as I can remember, trails have always been my friend. From the one’s we use to travel along as kids in the neighborhood woods to the park ones I walked last weekend.

This article over at High Country News entitled “A Network of Trails That Spans the Countryreminded me of those trails and those times. I’ve even blazed my own trail, the one that I walk every day at lunch when I go to the public library.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

VIA Rail Canada and Trans Canada Trail

Back when my oldest son was still quite young, I acquired a videotape of the VIA Rail Canada train and I must admit, I rather enjoy it as well. It’s about a train that runs east and west, from Toronto to Vancouver, Canada.  I still think it would be something fun to do one day with him and maybe all of my kids.

Anyway, I recently came across an alternative route that is a little more environmentally friendly, called the Trans Canada Trail. All told, it runs over 15oo miles, starting in Newfoundland and stretching west across the great white, as well as, north to British Columbia.

The article on the Trans Canada Trail is entitled “World’s longest car-free trail stretching 15,000 miles to open next year in Canada” by Tafline Laylin over at Inhabitat. Something tells me if we do one, it will probably be the VIA Rail Canada. At least it’s still environmentally friendly in that it’s public transportation.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Phantom Forest Conservation Area

Today  the kids and I walked a new trail over in the Phantom Forest Conservation Area. It’s a rather small green space, only about thirteen acres total but the view from the top is pretty nice.

That’s where the remains of an house sit, along with a small plaque describing the area. It belong to Ray and Claire Moore and it turns out that he, was the illustrator of the Phantom Comic.

I also took a few pictures. Here’s one of my favorites:

PineTree

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

What is landscape?

I came across a review of this book today in the weekend Wall Street Journal but, unfortunately you have to have a subscription just to view it on their website. So I did the next best thing, I found a review of What is Landscape? over on the publishers page.

What made the original review interesting is that it was written by Tristian Gooley, the author of a book I’m reading right now, The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs (Which in the U.K.. is The Walker’s Guide to Outdoor Clues and signs).

As soon as I’m done with this book and the one that I’ve been reading for what seems like forever, Wales : epic views of a small country by Jan Morris, then I’ll get right to this book.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

 

Happenstance

I came upon this article simply by happenstance. It makes me think back to a time when I played in the woods as a kid and makes me wonder how we were able to always find our way back.

Maybe in some way, we had our own trail trees or markers but didn’t necessarily know it. It’s something I’m trying to pass on to my kids in a way as well. To use trees and other natural objects as trail markers.

The article is entitled “Trail trees are a living Native American legacy” by Laura Moss over at the Mother Nature Network. Meanwhile, keep on walking.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian