Archive for the ‘Water’ Category

Ocean blue

Okay, here’s another one of those articles which I am recommending that is over at the Wall Street Journal.  Unfortunately you will need either a subscription to the Journal online or you can hop on down to your local library and look for the Review Section of the March 11-12 weekend edition page C4.

The article is entitled “Why Is the Ocean Blue? We know that water is transparent and colorless, so what accounts for its color? Think of it as a big game of molecular pinball” by Helen Czerski. Another option however would be to check out her book Storm in a Teacup: The physics of everyday life , which came out last year. I just requested it myself.

Sail away!

   

Green Librarian

Great Lakes

I would be the first to admit that going up to see Lake Superior and Lake Michigan this summer was pretty cool. I will also admit that I’ve always admired Lake Baikal over in Russian is also pretty cool. The fact that it holds 20% of the Earth’s unfrozen freshwater is also pretty amazing.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Summer at the lake?

When I came across this article the other day entitled“Why is Lake Abert Disappearing” by Rob Davis over at the Oregonian Newspaper after stumbling upon the article “When Water Turns to Dust” over at High Country News by Hillary Rosner (which unfortunately has no link), it instantly reminded me of Lake Mead and the recent record low that it hit earlier this year.

Here’s a great article on Lake Mead, entitled “Lake Mead reaches a record low” by over at Earthsky. This whole climate change is really  hitting home this summer. With the fires in Ft. McMurray (where one of the St. Louis Blues hockey players is from) and the fact now that we’ve been at 99 degrees here in St. Louis the last three days and it’s only June.

Ouch!

  

Green Librarian

Without water, there is fire

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Water residency and transit time

Just like humans, water resides in different places and spends time traveling to get from place to place. Also like humans, that time varies from drop to drop (or person to person). So then the questions are, how long does water reside in one place and how much time does it take to travel from one place to another?

Thankfully, we human are beginning to search for answers to these questions, according to the article entitled “How long does a water molecule stay in a river? The speed at which it leaves is critical to conservation efforts” by John Donovan over at Mother Nature Network.

Then maybe one day I can answer the burning question, how long it take a toy boat to travel from Lake Itaska down the Mighty Mississippi River down to the Gulf of Mexico? Believe me, the kids and I have tried but will little success.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

18 types of frozen water?

When I came across this article, the first thought that went through my head is, there are seventeen types of frozen water? As a hockey fan, I’ve really only known one type of frozen water and that’s the kind they play hockey on.

The article is entited “A new form of frozen water? New study describes what could be the 18th known form of ice“, from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. So my new question is, is it solid enough to play hockey on?

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

Ice stacking

Having been to Duluth, Minnesota this past summer and getting to hang out by lake Superior, I knew I had to post this video and then of course, I thought we need to go up there in the winter.

Okay, maybe not in the middle of winter but it would be fun, as evident by this article/video entitled “Watch hypnotic ‘ice stacking’ on Lake Superior” by Russell McLendon at Mother Nature Network.

The kids, my mom and I got to watch one of those huge freighters come in and that’s cool but, this was cool (or should I say cold) in a different way. It was all nature, no human’s were needed. That’s my kind of fun.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian