Leaves

Tonight’s article comes from an author I’ve read many times before and while is only partly about leaves, leaves are something I dearly miss these days. After the last of our four big trees came down recently, They’re like missing a dear friend.

The article is entitled “McClellan: Giving thanks for falling leaves” by Bill McClellan over at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. While I still miss the leaves, there are plenty of things in nature to be thankful for.

One of those actually happened today with my middle child and my mom. They were out at the Wildlife Rescue Center today, getting a gift for one of my nieces when he said to my mom, I remember when dad to use to bring us out around here. That’s a gift that is truly priceless.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Whale of a heart

Ever since I read the book The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea by Philip Hoare, I’ve been fascinated by whales. In fact, tonight at Thanksgiving we got to talking about Cape Cod and among the stories I shared, was the time we I took a ferry to Nantucket when actually spotted what was believed to be a whale.

So reading this article tonight was insightful to say the least. The article is entitled “Scientists surprised by what first-ever recording of a blue whale’s heart reveals over at Treehugger. Such majestic animals.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

 

Lichens versus plants

Just to follow up on an earlier post of mine from last week entitled One of a kind, those lichens, I read tonight’s article at lunch today while at work. It’s entitled “In the Race to Live on Land, Lichens didn’t beat Plants by JoAnna Klein over at the New York Times. It’s a topic that I believe was also discussed in the previous post.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

The mighty Nile

While I live in the city of St. Louis and actually work downtown near the mighty Mississippi river, there is another famous river, the Nile that I’m also familiar with. That’s in large part because of my love for world history and role that the river has played in history. So when I came across this article, and later a second one which goes into greater detail regarding the age of the Nile, I knew I had to post them.

The first article, entitled “Why Nile hasn’t changed course in 30 million yearsby Eleanor Imster over at Earthsky is about something I never really thought about regarding the Nile. It’s the path by which it flows over the earth.

The second article, entitled “Nile River Formed Millions of Years Earlier Than Thought, Study Suggests by Yasemin Saplakoglu is over at LiveScience. It goes more into the issue of the rivers age. A fascinating river and like the Mississippi river, definitely mighty as well.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

One of a kind, those lichens

So ever since I read the book Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet Worms: The Story of the Animals and Plants That Time Has Left Behind by Richard Forte, I’ve been fascinated by early forms of life on this planet. Truth be told, I’ve read very little on lichens, until now.

The article is entitled “The unexpectedly weird and beautiful world of lichens” by Jaymi Heimbuch over at Mother Nature Network. I’m thinking I need to keep my eyes open for them when I’m out taking pictures.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Meteorites in Missouri

So this story was all over the local news recently as a meteorite was believed to have struck Warren County, Missouri last night. As someone who has always looked up to the sky, particularly when we’re up in northern Minnesota, I found this story incredibly fascinating.

The article is entitled “Scientists think there may be meteorites in this Missouri pasture. The hunt is on” by over at our local newspaper, the  What I wouldn’t give to go and take a look for the meteorite myself.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Mussels

Now I must admit, I know very little about mussels so when I came across this article, I got the chance to learn a little more. When my kids were younger, we use to come across mussel shells at one of our local nature areas, Emmenegger Nature Park.

It’s located along the Meramec river and at the time, we were able to actually walk right in the river. Most of the shells we came across were just that, the remains of a meal for another animal. These days, you can’t get anywhere near the river. Just a few weeks ago, I took this picture of the river overflowing after a heavy rain.

MeramecRiver2

It’s hard to tell where the river ends and the riverbank begins. Anyway, the article tonight is entitled “Missouri’s Essential Freshwater Mussels by Stephen E. McMurray over at the Missouri Conservationist magazine.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Who, who…

Back when my kids were young, we use to do what was called an Owl Prowl with the Missouri Department of Conservation. So over the years I’ve come to really appreciate Owls. In fact, a few years ago at home, I actually had a conversation with an Owl. If you’ve heard this story before, then just jump ahead.

First the Owl did it’s usual call, then taking what I learned at the Owl Prowl’s, I responded. Then the owl replied, then I answered, anyway you get the idea. So this article touched my heart when read it.

The article is entitled “Firefighters save great horned owl from ashes of California wildfirebyMary Jo DiLonardo over at Mother Nature Network. Whooo doesn’t love a great owl story?!

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Bee whisperer

So this is an article I came across tonight about a gentleman known as a bee whisperer and since bees have been a topic of mine lately, it made sense to post this article. I will say, with all my interest in photography the past few months, one of my favorite subjects has been bees. One of my favorite pictures of a honeybee is this one I took a couple of summers ago, before I really got into using my new camera.

Bee2

I think I may have actually posted this picture before. Anyway, the article tonight is entitled “Behold the bare-handed bee whisperer who is saving the honeybeesby over at Treehugger. I still love that picture.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

The mighty Meramec river

Okay, so most people don’t call it mighty like the mighty Mississippi, still from the view I had over the weekend, it looked pretty amazing. So a few weeks ago I decided to start using my new(ish) camera to start taking pictures of nature and posting them to see if I have what it takes to sell some of them through other websites.

Anyway, this past weekend I went to Castlewood park, which is located out west a bit from where I live. It’s a place I use to take my kids sometimes and a park that I always loved to go to.

Turns out I picked an amazing day to go there, along with lots of other people and while I had some difficulty with my camera, I did manage to get at least one what I would call really nice picture of the river looking down from the cliffs of Castlewood park. I hope you like it.

MeramecRiver1A

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian