Archive for the ‘Nature’ Category

Nature & dictionaries

So the article I’m posting tonight is one I came across in a local newspaper recently here called Healthy Planet. After doing a bit of research however, like most librarian’s do, turns out this story actually is from 2015. The article here is entitled “A is for Acorn, Not Analog – Nature Words Gone From a Dictionary” by Linda Wiggen Kraft.

While my kids are older now, nature was one of the first things I introduced them to. The other night in fact, I was talking with my mom about how I use to take them on Owl Prowl’s, Amphibian Nights and other assorted adventures through the Missouri Department of Conservation’s and their Conservation Connections Newsletter.

So because of that and for my kids, I feel inspired to try and help make a difference in my own small way. Here’s a link to the contact page for Oxford University Press. I’ve already e-mailed them to let them know I am disappointed in learning this and will no long use or recommend their dictionaries in the future, either as a parent or librarian.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian

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Dark in the night

Reading this article today entitled “The First Dark Sky Reserve in the U.S. is a Stargazer’s Paradise” by Michael E’stries over at the Mother Nature Network just got me more excited about dark skies, that and the Wolf Moon that happened the other night.

You see I just got my first good camera, a Nikon D3400 and so now I’m really looking forward to taking pictures at night of the moon and the stars, not to mention the rest of mother nature. I don’t know how well I’ll do but wish me luck!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Nature’s miniature miracles

Since I have my kids on Wednesday nights usually, I don’t get the chance to watch the Nature show on PBS very often. So tonight I got the chance and I must admit I really like this episode entitled “Nature’s Miniature Miracles “. It was about some of natures smallest creatures, a few of which I was familiar with.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

150 Migration paths (simultaneously)

So I written several post’s on the migration paths of various animals but here’s an article and video that talk about and show the migration paths for 150 animals, all at the same time. The article is entitled “Watch 150 Animal Species Roam the Globe in This Amazing Migration Animation” by Melissa Breyer over at Treehugger.

There is also a link in the article to Movebank, an online database of animal tracking data where researchers can share their data. I think the article does a really nice job of showing how other species work in harmony with the planet, rather than against it.

Sincerely-

       

Green Librarian

People or sentient beings, it’s all in your perspective

So when I read this article, I was under the impression it was all about plants and animals when in fact, it’s all about people. The salmon people, bear people, oak people, raven people and others.

To get a better understanding of what I’m talking about, check out the article entitled “Why I obsess About the Names of Plants and Animals” by Pepper Trail over at High Country News. It may give you a whole new perspective on nature and the world we live in.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Thoreau

So tonight I have another post about Thoreau and his 200th birthday but unfortunately it’s over at the Wall Street Journal, so unless you have an online account with the Wall Street Journal, it can be found at your local library in the July 15-16 weekend edition.

The article is entitled “Thoreau at 200” by Randall Fuller over at the Wall Street Journal. It’s definitely worth the time to read. If not, you can go back to my earlier post entitled In Wildness is the Preservation of the World. Or you can just go read Thoreau’s book Walden. Anyway you look at it, you can’t lose.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

In wildness is the preservation of the world

So I’ll admit it, I didn’t know that July 12, 2017 is the 200th birthday of Henry David Thoreau but like so much of my life these days, I seem to stumble upon what I need, when I need it.

This article, entitled “Thoreau’s Wilderness Legacy, Beyond the Shores of Walden Pond ” by Douglas Brinkley over at the New York Times is what I ran into today. Happy (belated) Birthday Henry! I think it’s time to take a walk.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian