Driftwood

So we made it back from Minnesota last week and while I didn’t finish my book The Ground Beneath Us by Paul Bogard or in fact read any of, I did enjoy our time at the cabin and surrounding area.

In fact, one of things that I did do was take lots and lots of pictures with my new digital camera, mostly of sunsets but also the surrounding scenery. In fact, one of my favorite pictures involves both the sunset and driftwood.

So imagine my surprise when I came across the article entitled “The Surprising Beauty and Benefits of Driftwood” by Russell McLendon over at the Mother Nature Network. I actually read it today on my way and from work.

That said I will now return to the previously mentioned book but not before sharing that inspirational picture (at least to me):

DriftwoodSunset

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

 

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What’s under our feet

So the book I’m reading right now is entitled The Ground Beneath Us, the second book I’ve read by Paul Bogard and ironically it’s around the same time of year as when I read his first one. When we’re getting ready to go on vacation to our cabin in Minnesota, which it turns out is where he’s from.

When I read his first book, entitled The End of Night, it really rang a bell because our cabin is about three and half hours north of the twin cities which gives us the gift of very dark nights and lots of stars. Something I can never get around here in St. Louis.

While that connection isn’t there, I still find this book every bit as interesting, since I too  have often wondered what’s under out feet. As someone who was born in Iowa (one of the many states he covers in this book) and who in fact has relatives there, which we will be visiting, I will perhaps find myself a little more observant this time around while on their farm.

Anyway, I’m hoping to finish the book while we’re up in Minnesota, where I lived as well for a short time and can’t wait to visit again. For both the stars above and the ground below.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

 

 

 

 

Trees in Lebanon

As I’ve said many times before, I love trees. The last book I just finished reading in fact, The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben, taught me so much more about trees than I think I knew was possible.

It also adds a bit more background to tonight’s article, “Climate Change is Killing the Cedars of Lebanon” by Anne Barnard at the New York Times. By that, I mean in the sense that while climate change is going on, these trees are continuing to fight to survive in so many ways.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

Heading north

Since I missed last Thursday and Tuesday of this week, plus in a week we’ll be making our annual trip up north to our family cabin in Minnesota, I thought I would post two articles tonight and this article in particular. I’ve been to both Bemidji and Duluth, both places used as directional advisors in this article, so either way we’ve got it covered.

The article is entitled “1 Hen, 76 Ducklings: What’s the Deal with this Picture?” by Sarah Mervosh over at the New York Times. Makes me want to jump in the car tonight. Oh well, only one more week.

Sincerely-

     

Green Librarian

 

Landmarks

So when I read this book review (actually two of them) for the book Landmarks by Robert Macfarlane, I was immediately taken back to my childhood. To the times we played in the woods and all the landmarks that were there. I’m reminded of the train tunnel, the open stony field and the grassy open field as well, which is now full of houses.

Anyway, the first review is over at the Wall Street Journal, which yes isn’t available unless you have a subscription. It’s entitled “Why You Can’t  Say Where You Are” by Tom Shippey. It’s also in the August 6-7, 2016 weekend edition of the Wall Street Journal.

I also happen to come across a review of the book over at the New York Time which is entitled “Review: ‘Landmarks’ a Book on Language and Landscape” by Sarah Lyall. Either way, it’s a great read and if you’re like me, will take you back to another time.

Enjoy!

     

Green Librarian

Plastics up north

So while all the headlines these day’s talk about plastics and our oceans, this story tonight is on another chapter of that story. It’s also about a place near and dear to my heart, the great lakes. The article is entitled “The Great Lakes Contain as much Plastic as the Oceans” by Katherine Martinko over at Treehugger.

On the bright side, I’ve greatly reduced my use of what are known as single-use plastic, like straws and plastic bags. In fact, tonight my son got a mint oreo shake and used one of our reusable metal straws. Yea!

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Beaches & more

So my friend on the other side of the world went to the beach today (or yesterday if you’re over there). Anyway, tonight’s article (and a book that I can’t remember if  I’ve read so I went ahead and requested it from the library tonight) about sand, are real eye openers on a topic that most of us I’m sure don’t really think about.

On my ride to work each morning via our local train however, we pass a newly built station that reminds me of this topic. Now you might be thinking what does a station stop have to do with sand. Well, the main ingredient for cement or concrete is of course sand.

Anyway, check out this article entitled “Is the World Running out of Sand? The Truth behind Stolen Beaches and Dredges Islands” by Neil Tweedie over at The Guardian. If that doesn’t do it for you, check out the book Sand the Never-ending Story by Michael Welland. Now since I can’t remember if I’ve read this book already, let me just apologize now if I’ve recommended this book before.

Sincerely-

  

Green Librarian