Words for nature

Now I came across today’s article from a blog I’d honestly never heard of before called Writeshop. I happened upon it as I was creating a display at work for the December theme Write to a Friend Month.

The article, entitled “How to make word banks about nature” by and it reminded me of an older post I did about the words we have for nature and how these days, they seem to be disappearing.

Unfortunately, I can’t remember for the life of me the article I’m referring to but when I do, I will remember to post it. Okay, update, I did find the post. It’s entitled “What is landscape?“. Enjoy!

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Giving the gift of education

So like most nights, I always have more than enough articles to share but this one is perhaps more of a gift and what better time to give a gift than during the holiday season.

It’s actually an advertisement made because as the article states, Iceland became the first major UK supermarket to announce they are removing palm oil from all its own-brand products. The article and video are entitled “Supermarket Iceland’s advert for Christmas has been banned for being too political” over at LBC (Leading Britain’s Conversation).

Perhaps it will be the gift that keeps on giving and if you want to give a gift that keeps on giving, then please share this post. As an old saying that I grew up with goes, there’s no time like the present.

Merry Christmas!

 

Green Librarian

Dogs and wolves

As someone whose always loved wolves, this was a really cool article that came out last week about the discovery of an 18,000 year old puppy in Siberia that may help scientist truly connect the two.

The article is entitled “Mummified Pup Died in Siberia 18,000 Years Ago … And Might Be a Wolf (or Something Else)” by Mindy Weisberger over at LiveScience. At this point, scientist are unsure if this is a wolf, a dog or something else. I guess what can be said is stay tune to find out.

Sincerely-

 

Green Libarian

Leaves

Tonight’s article comes from an author I’ve read many times before and while is only partly about leaves, leaves are something I dearly miss these days. After the last of our four big trees came down recently, They’re like missing a dear friend.

The article is entitled “McClellan: Giving thanks for falling leaves” by Bill McClellan over at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. While I still miss the leaves, there are plenty of things in nature to be thankful for.

One of those actually happened today with my middle child and my mom. They were out at the Wildlife Rescue Center today, getting a gift for one of my nieces when he said to my mom, I remember when dad to use to bring us out around here. That’s a gift that is truly priceless.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Whale of a heart

Ever since I read the book The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea by Philip Hoare, I’ve been fascinated by whales. In fact, tonight at Thanksgiving we got to talking about Cape Cod and among the stories I shared, was the time we I took a ferry to Nantucket when actually spotted what was believed to be a whale.

So reading this article tonight was insightful to say the least. The article is entitled “Scientists surprised by what first-ever recording of a blue whale’s heart reveals over at Treehugger. Such majestic animals.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

 

Lichens versus plants

Just to follow up on an earlier post of mine from last week entitled One of a kind, those lichens, I read tonight’s article at lunch today while at work. It’s entitled “In the Race to Live on Land, Lichens didn’t beat Plants by JoAnna Klein over at the New York Times. It’s a topic that I believe was also discussed in the previous post.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

The mighty Nile

While I live in the city of St. Louis and actually work downtown near the mighty Mississippi river, there is another famous river, the Nile that I’m also familiar with. That’s in large part because of my love for world history and role that the river has played in history. So when I came across this article, and later a second one which goes into greater detail regarding the age of the Nile, I knew I had to post them.

The first article, entitled “Why Nile hasn’t changed course in 30 million yearsby Eleanor Imster over at Earthsky is about something I never really thought about regarding the Nile. It’s the path by which it flows over the earth.

The second article, entitled “Nile River Formed Millions of Years Earlier Than Thought, Study Suggests by Yasemin Saplakoglu is over at LiveScience. It goes more into the issue of the rivers age. A fascinating river and like the Mississippi river, definitely mighty as well.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian