Archive for the ‘Astronomy’ Category

Dark skies and light pollution

So after doing a little research, like we librarians like to do, I was able to find the book I mentioned yesterday. The book is entitled The End of Night by Paul Bogard and I highly recommend it. I’ve also included it on the green reading page.

FYI, I also found out he has a new book entitled The Ground Beneath Us. I’ll let you know how that is as I just requested it this morning.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

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Dark skies

So excuse me if you heard this one. I thought I posted this article before but maybe I haven’t. One of my favorite things about the earth is actually the night sky. I love it when we’re up north on vacation and you can look at the sky.

I’ve often said to my kids that the sky looks so full of stars, like you couldn’t stick another one up there because there’s no room. Anyway, the article is entitled “The World’s 11 Certified Dark Sky Reserves, Where the Stars Run Riot ” by Melissa Bryer over at Treehugger.

When I read this article it actually reminded me of a book I read at the library a few years back but I can’t for the life of me remember the title. Perhaps that’s a re-post for another night. First I need to go back and find the book.

Sincerely-

   

Green Librarian

 

Discovery is in the stars

I’ve always found it amazing how I come across articles just on the very topics I’ve been reading about and tonight is no different. Just this morning I was reading how a gentleman named Heinrich Schwabe, from Germany back in 1789, was looking for what he believed was the next planet Vulcan.  Unfortunately, he thought it existed within the orbit of Mercury.

For that story and more, check out The Sun’s Heartbeat and Other Stories from the Life of the Star that Powers Our Planet by Bob Berman. Meanwhile, for those today who are looking for the next Vulcan, they might do well to read this article over at EarthSky entitled “New Method of Finding Planets Scores it’s First Discovery“. So where is my telescope?

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

 

Meteors, meteorites and asteroids

Okay, after talking with my daughter this weekend about meteors and asteroids and how often they happen/hit earth, did I come across these two great articles here in our St. Louis newspaper the St. Louis Post-Dispatch while at work today.

The first article dealing with what is being referred to as a cosmic coincidence in “Earth sees meteor and asteroid on the same day” by Steven Perlberg at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. There is also a video courtesy of CBS in Philadelphia.

The other article is a great educational tool to help define meteors and meteorites (something I hadn’t thought about) and is entitled “Examining meteors, meteoritesby Alan Fredman and also at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. We learn something new everyday.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

History of space here on earth

1,000 or 66,000,000 years ago, it’s amazing how we are able to reconstruct what has happened in space with clues here on earth.  According to one article, “Space Explosion to Blame for Tree Ring Mystery, Astronomers Say“by Clara Moskowitz at Space.com, we see evidence in tree rings about an  gamma-ray burst that happened somewhere between 3,000 and 12,000 light-years away from earth.

“While just recently we’ve found more clues to support one of the possible ideas as to how dinosaurs became extinct over 66,000,000years ago in the article “Asteroid Impact That Killed the Dinosaurs: New Evidence” by Charles Choi at LiveScience.

Sincerely-

 

Green Librarian

Scattered lights

Since my thoughts seem to be kind of scattered today, I thought I would do a post on another scattered item, the lights in the sky.

First up, this article on some lights here on the ground. It’s entitled “The Bonfire of the Fireflies” by Brian Clark Howard at The Daily Green. Good stuff.

Then looking a little higher we have “Can We Have Too Much Light?” by Roseann Moring at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch but unfortunately, I couldn’t find a link to this article, followed by “Light Brings Lakes to Life” by Paul (no last name) at the New Scientist.

Finally, if your just looking up in the sky to see what’s out there, then here’s a great article about someone else who is doing the same thing (who would have thought the Vatican). It’s entitled “Vatican’s Celestial Eye, Seeking Not Angels but Data” by George Johnson at the New York Times.

Lights out!

Green Librarian

Kids day

Being that I forgot to bring much to post today, I thought I would fall back on the old reliable, my kids.

First up, a book that hwe have read often and I’ve been meaning to talk about for quite a while now, The Trouble with Dragons by Debi Gliori.

Next, if getting the kids out into nature is your goal, then try this post “Barbara Butler: Treehouses FOR KIDS!” by Sami Grover at Treehugger.

Finally, if the kids are looking for something fun to do and you can’t get outside, try “Microsoft’s Worldwide Telescope  Will Light Your Fuse” by Edward C. Baig at USA Today. There they can check out the world beyond their world.

Sincerely-

Green Librarian